Homi K. Bhabha The Location of Culture %28Routledge Classics%29 1994


Чтобы посмотреть этот PDF файл с форматированием и разметкой, скачайте его и откройте на своем компьютере.
CULTURE
K
published
1994
published
Canada
29
West
35th
York,
1994
Homi
London
Britain
Books
acid
free
rights
reserved.
No
book
or
reproduced
or
utilized
form
or
electronic,
mechanical,
or
or
hereafter
invented,
including
photocopying
or
information
storage
or
93-10757
ISBN
0-415-01635-5
Bhabha
theory
postcolonial
-
"
Stereotype,
discrimination
and,
man:
The
ambivalence
discourse
for
wonders:
Questions
-7
.and
nonsense
e 9
newness
enters
the
world:
,
trials
of
'Race',
time
revision
memory
of
gratitude
best
served
neat
lists
of
people
and
places
that
acknowledgements
can
accommodate.
The
help
we
receive
is
a
more
haphazard
affair.
me
particular
pleasure
to
note
that
most
of
those
mentioned
below
have
sat
at
our
kitchen
table.
In
that
spirit
academic
acquaintance
has
often
turned
into
enduring
friendship.
The
evolution
of
this
book
owes
a
personal
debt
to
a
group
of
and
co-conspirators:
for
asking
the
unthought
question;
James
Donald
for
the
pleasures
of
precision,
with­
out
saying
'precisely';
Robert
his
fine
readings
toler­
ance
for
telephone
theory;
and
Gyan
insisting
that
be
leavened
with
style.
I
to
acknowledge
the
pioneering
Edward
provided
me
with
a
critical
terrain
and
Spiyak:s
and
brilliance,
which
has
provided me
stay
tuned
to
the
materialist
mode
have
proved
to
advice.
work
of
Toni
Morrison
has
been
formative
in
on
narrative
of
on
'migrant'
and
minority
space
have
been
sparked
off
by
the
novels
of
I
owe
these
remarkable
writers
a
significant
personal
and
In
allowing
me
to
quote
from
two
of
his
inspirational
poems
Derek
shown
great
generosity.
has
Anish
Kapoor,
exploration
of
sculptural
space
has
provided
for
the
cover.
been
exemplary
in
his
ability,
over
the
years,
to
forge
a
shared
project
through
a
subtle
and
to
postcolonial
questions.
[oan
Copjec
instantly
'mimicry'
me
to
read
Lacan.
The
Essex
Conference
Collective
me
to
take
Steinberg
Visiting
Professorship.
to
John
to
with
delight.
Arnold
Rampersad
with
his
time
Cornel
West's
presence
was
an
inspiration
to
re-think
'race';
I
learned
Nell
Painter
West's
seminars
on
the
African
American
Intellectual
tradition.
I
owe
a
great
a
English
have
opportunities.
Alberta
Arthurs,
Tomas
Ybarra
Frausto
Szwaja
at
the
Rockefeller
Foundation
have
to
think
environments.
events
the
provides
a
skein
My
were
active
participants
Laura
Chrissman,
Frank
Gloversmith,
Tony
Inglis,
Gabriel
[osipovici,
[acqueline
Rose,
Alan
Sinfield,
Jenny
Taylor,
Cedric
Watts
have
been
particularly
generous
at
various
times.
There
are
others,
close
friends
companions,
daily
shared
pleasure
Lisa
Appignanesi,
Emily
Apter,
Dorothy
Bednarowska,
Ellice
Begbie,
Lauren
Berlant,
Benjamin
Buchloh,
Victor
Burgin,
Bea
Campbell,
lain
Chambers.
Ron
Clark,
Lidia
Curti.
Nick
Dirks,
John
Forrester,
David
Frankel,
Tschome
Gabriel,
[ulian,
Adil
Jussawalla,
Mary
Kelly,
Emesto
Laclau,
David
Lloyd,
Lisa
Lowe,
Liz
Moore,
Rob
Nixon,
Nicos
Papastergiadis,
Benita
Ping
Helena
Reckitt,
Bruce
Robbins,
Irene
Sheard,
Stephen
Sleaman,
Val
Smith,
[ennifer
Stone,
Mitra
Tabrizian,
Tony
Vidler,
Gauri
Viswanathan,
Yvonne
Wood.
has
with
me
Henriques
has
often
John
Walkowitz
helped
publication
I
have
enjoyed
a
relationship
[anice
been
a
friend
all
stages
work.
has
me.
The
elegance
Rodgers'
style
extends
from
the
cover
to
the
content;
working
has
a
lesson
bility.
are
countries
my
parents
have
been
a
source
To
Hilla
offer
my
heartfelt
thanks
for
countless
considerations
I
am
deeply
for
My
children
have
They
have
never
respected
the
sanctity
study.
Their
interruptions
have
been
fre­
Beyond
this
book
or
any
other,
line
for
sharing
dissatisfaction
the
thought,
bearing
the
the
kind
permission
British
Film
Institute.
'Interrogating
identity'
from
by
David
Goldberg
the
kind
permission
University
other
question'
is
reprinted
from
by
kind
permission
Mass.:
civility'
reprinted
with
kind
permission
from
taken
for
reprinted
kind
permission
University
and
by
Henry
Louis
Gates
the
archaic'
from
by
Gaya-Ryan
Press)
the
kind
permission
reprinted
from
Greenblatt
the
kind
permission
Association.
is
reprinted
with
kind
per­
mission
from
by
Robert
(1991)
©
from
the
song
'Ac-cent-tchu-ate
the
Positive'
are
reproduced
kind
permission
Publications-
Ltd.
architecture
of
is
rooted
in
the
temporal.
Every
human
problem
must
be
considered
from
the
standpoint
of
time.
(Frantz
Fanon:
Skin,
White
Masks)
got
to
'Ac-cent-tchu-ate
the
pos-i-tive,
E-li-mi-nate
the
neg-a-tive',
Latch
on
to
the
af-firm-a-tive,
Don't
mess
with
Mister
In-be-tween.
(refrain
from
'Ac-cent-tchu-ate
the
Positive'
by
Johnny
Mercer)
boundary
that
at
which
ART
PRESENT
the
trope
of
the
question
of
culture
in
the
realm
century's
edge,
we
are
less
exercised
of
the
birth
of
the
'subject'.
today
is
marked
tenebrous
sense
of
survival,
borderlines
of
the
'present',
for
which
there
seems
to
be
current
and
controversial
shiftiness
of
the
. . .
middle
years;
transit
cross
to
produce
complex
figures
of
past
and
present,
inside
and
outside,
sense
of
disorientation,
a
disturbance
of
in
exploratory,
restless
movement
French
rendition
of
the
words
on
fall
and
away
from
the
singularities
of
'class'
or
'gender'
as
primary
conceptual
categories,
in
an
awareness
of
the
sub'ect
ositions
-
of
race,
gender,
generation,
institutionaf
[email protected]_orientation
that
inhabit
any
claim
to
identity
in
the
is
to
focus
on
those
moments
or
are
produced
of
cultural
'in­
terrain
for
elaborating
strategies
of
selfbbod
-
new
OF
CULTURE
sites
of
collaboration,
and
contestation,
act
of
defining
the
of
ence
of
the
the
overla
and
dis
laceme
of
domains
of
difference-
e
intersubjective
el'lees
are
n
orme
difference
(usually
intoned
as
race/class/gender,
profoundly
antagonistic,
conflictual
and
even
incommensurable?
The
force
of
these
questions
is
borne
'language'
of
recent
social
crises
sparked
off
of
cultural
difference.
Conflicts
in
South
Central
hybridities
that
moments
of
;f;;;ntation:.
':and
privilege
does.
persistence
of
tradition;
it
is
resourced
power
of
tradition
to
be
reinscribed
through
the
con­
contingency
that
attend
upon
the
lives
who
are
minority'.
that
tradition
bestows
.
is
a
partial
form
of
the
past
it
introduces
incommensurable
'cultural
the
This
process
estranges
any
immediate
access
to
an
originary
identity
or
a
'received'
tradition.
The
borderline
engagements
of
cultural
difference
may
as
often
as
conflictual;
they
may
confound
definitions
of
tradition
and
modernity;
realign
the
customary
bound­
aries
. . .
_
back
not
making
a
claim
to
any
specific
way
of
being.
writes
Green,
African-American artist.
. . .
solidarity
from
the
interstitial
perspective\
Social
differences
are
not
simply
given
to
experience
through
authenticated
cultural
tradition;
they
are
the
signs
of
the
emergence
of
as
a
at
takes
you
'beyond'
yourself
in
rder
to
then,
it's
still
a
struggle
for
power
questions
open
interstitial
space
inter­
vention
within
this
Site,
The
Institute
of
Contemporary
Art,
Long
Island
City,
New
-
Black/White,
Self/Other.
Green
makes
a
the
architecture
literally
as
a
reference,
using
the
attic,
the
boiler
room,
stairwell
to
make
associations
as
higher
and
heaven
and
hell.
The
stairwell
became
a
liminal
space,
a
pathway
OF
CULTURE
lower
areas,
each
of
which
was
annotated
with
plaques
referring
to
blackness
and
whiteness.
stairwell
as
liminal
space,
and
thither
of
the
stairwell.
the
temporal
that
it
allows,
prevents
identities
at
either
end
of
it
from
primordial
polarities.
This
interstitial
or
unposed


went
back
and
forth
progress,
promises
,
the
barrier
act
of
unknowable,
unrepresentable,
wtthout
a
the
process
disjunct
The
imaginary
of
spatial
distance
-
to
live
some-
bord
into
relief
the
temporal,
social
interrupt
our
collusive
sense
of
cultural
can
a
future,
no
longer
a
inequalities.
its
Unlikg_Jhe
history
that
tells
the
beads
of
sequential-
time
like
a
rosary,
seeking
to
establish
serial,
causal
connections,
we
are
with
what.
Walter
moment
of
histo
,
o
our
.
-
has
meaning
at
all,
it
does
not
lie
in
the
popular
use
of
sequentiality
-
after-feminism;
or
polarity
-
These
terms
that
insistently
gesture
to
the
beyond,
only
its
restless
and
revisionary
energy
if
they
transform
the
present
and
ex-centric
site
of
experience
and
empowerment:
interest
in
postmodemism
is
limited
to
a
celebration
of
the
fragmentation
of
the
of
postenlightenment
rationalism
then,
for
all
its
intellectual
excitement,
a
pro­
enterprise.
wider
significance
of
the
postmodem
condition
lies
in
the
the
epistemological
'limits'
of
those
of
a
range
of
other
-
women,
the
colonized,
minority
groups,
the
bear-
of
policed
the
demography
the
ism
is
the
history
of
cultural
social
displacements
of.
communities,
the
in
this
sense
that
the
·
ever
differently
the
bridge
escorts
the
of
and
fro,
so
that
they
may
concepts
of
homogenous
national
cultures,
the
consensual
transmission
of
historical
traditions,
through
the
death,
literal
of
the
of
history,
culturally
contingent
border­
lines
of
modern
side
of
the
psychosis
of
patriotic
fervour,
to
think,
there
is
overwhelming
evidence
of
a
more
transnational
sense
of
the
hybridity
of
imagined
com­
munities.
Contemporary
Sri
represents
the
deadly
con­
the
fabulist
historiography
of
post-Independence
India
in
to
remind
the
truest
eye
may
now
belong
to
the
migrant's
double
visi()I\;_Ioni
MQrrison's
the
past
of
possession
and
self-possession,
in
order
to
project
a
contemporary
fable
of
a
woman's
history
that
is
at
the
same
time
the
narrative
of
historic
memory
of
public
sphere
of
men
alike.
What
is
striking
about
the
is
that
from
the
specific
to
the
general,
from
the
material
to
the
contemporary
culture,
as
with
that
does
Increas-
OF
'national'
cultures
are
being
produced
from
the
perspective
minorities.
The
most
significant
effect
of
this
the
proliferation
of
'alternative
histories
of
the
excluded'
producing,
as
some
would
have
it,
a
pluralist
anarchy.
What
my
examples
show
is
the
changed
basis
for
making
international
connections.
The
currency
of
critical
comparativism,
in
a
'homogeneous
empty
time'
of
modernity
and
progress.
The
great
connective
narratives
of
drive
the
engines
of
social
reproduction,
not,
in
themselves,
provide
a
foundational
frame
for
those
modes
of
cultural
identification
affect
that
form
around
issues
of
sexuality,
race,
feminism,
the
lifeworld
of
refugees
or
migrants,
deathly
social
destiny
of
testimony
of
represents
revision
of
itself.
What
this
geopolitical
space
may
be,
as
a
local
reality,
is
being
both
interrogated
finds its
its
part,
is
a
salutary
reminder
of
the
persistent
'neo-colonial'
relations
within
the
order
multi­
national
division
of
labour.
perspective
enables
the
authentication
of
histories
of
exploitation
and
the
evolution
of
strategies
of
resistance.
Beyond
this,
however,
postcolonial
critique
bears
witness
to
those
coun­
tries
and
communities
-
in
the
North
South,
urban
-
may
coin
a
phrase,
'otherwise
than
modernity'.
of
a
postcolonial
to
mod­
ernity,
discontinuous
or
in
contention
with
it,
resistant
to
its
oppressive,
assimilationist
technologies;
also
deploy
the
cultural
hybridity
of
their
borderline
conditions
to
'translate',
reinscribe,
the
social
imaginary
of
both
America
this
is
the
voice
cogercio
direciones
celebrating
Labor
Day
while
the
Klan
demonstrates
against
Mexicans
to
inhabit
space,
as
will
tell
you.
But
is
also,
as
revisionary
time,
a
contem
·
·
invention,
as
reen
enact
distinctive
work,
requires
a
sense
of
with
the
hybrid
chicano
continuum.
of
the
performance
present.
The
living.
to
make
a
hybrid
cultural
space
that
forms
contingently.
and
agency.
highly
decorated
four-
7
OF
CULTURE
into
the
primal
scene
of
lost-and-found
childhood
memories,
the
memorial
to
a
dead
nanny
Juana,
the
the
eroticism
of
the
Survival,
for
Osorio,
is
working
in
the
interstices
of
a
range
of
practices:
the
'space'
of
installation,
the
spectacle
of
the
social
statistic,
the
transitive
time
of
the
performance.
Finally,
the
photographic
art
of
Alan
Sekula
that
takes
the
border­
line
condition
of
cultural
translation
to
its
global
limit
in
photographic
project
'the
harbour
is
the
site
in
which
material
goods
appear
in
the
very
flux
of
exchange.'
harbour
Only
the
Captain
hears
a
familiar
melody.
nationalist
nostalgia
cannot
drown
babel
bluff.
Transnational
capitalism
and
the
impoverishment
of
the
certainly
create
the
circumstance
that
incarcerate
cultural
passage,
hither
and
thither,
as
migrant
workers,
the
massive
economic
and
political
diaspora
embody
the
Benjaminian
'present':
that
moment
blasted
the
continuum
of
history.
Such
conditions
(
of
and
sa£ial
where
political
survivors
become
the
best
historical
are
the
grounds
Fanon,
the
Martinican
psychoanalyst
and
participant
in
the
Algerian
of
As
soon
as
I
am
asking
to
be
considered.
I
am
not
merely
sealed
into
thingness.
I
somewhere
else
and
/
emphasis]
insofar
as
I
pursue
than
life;
insofar
as
I
for
the
creation
of
a
-
that
is
a
world
of
reciprocal
recognitions.
I
should
constantly
remind
myself
that
the
real
in
introducing
invention
into
existence.
In
the
world
in
which
I
travel,
I
am
endlessly
creating
myself.
beyond
the
historical,
instrumental
hypothesis
that
I
will
initiate
of
freedom.
more
the
desire
for
recognition,
'for
somewhere
else
space
of
cultural-interstices
that
invention
And
one
last
time,
there
is
a
iteration,
the
self
world
of
of
activity'
coll1Jsivi'present'.
resse
.
is
far
too
aware
of
the
dangers
of
the
fixity
'roots'
in
the
celebratory
romance
of
the
ast
history
of
the
present.
e
activi
is,
indeed,
the
intervention
of
esta
'shes
a
ge,
w
ere
.
world
-
-
o
UI\homed
is
not
to
be
homeless,
in
that
familiar
division
of
social
life
into
private
spheres.
The
unhomely
moment
creeps
stealthily
as
your
you
find
yourself
James's
Isabel
Archer,
a
the
measure
of
your
dwelling
in
a
state
of
'incredulous
terror'.
it
is
point
that
the
world
first
shrinks
for
Isabel
expands
enormously.
As
she
struggles
to
survive
the
fathomless
waters,
the
rushing
torrents,
James
introduces
the
in
that
rite
of
extra-territorial
that
displacement,
a
paradigmatic
colonial
condition,
that
can
be
heard
distinctly,
in
fictions
that
negotiate
the
powers
of
cultural
difference
in
a
range
of
transhistorical
sites.
already
heard
the
shrill
alarm
of
the
unhomely
in
that
moment
when
Isabel
Archer
realizes
that
her
world
OF
to
one
high,
as
becomes
the
house
the
house
thus
at
the
Palazzo
Roccanera
late
1870s,
little
earlier
outskirts
like
124
Bluestone
Road,
you
undecipherable
language
black
the
voice
Morrison's
unspeakable
thoughts,
century
later
Bengal
Swadeshi
or
Home
Rule
the
confined
space',
as
Tagore
describes
Home
by
'a
low
bass
note,
the
note
from
the
zenana,
the
secluded
as
she
crosses
the
affairs
-
ferry
to
ply.'l8
Much
closer
to
South
Africa,
Aila
a
stilling
atmos­
phere
as
she
makes
domesticity
into
the'
perfect
cover
for
gun-running:
found
strange
house,
hers
historical
specificities
diversities
each
texts
a
global
gestural;
case,
I
shall
only
the
Freud,
the
for
everything
have
remained
to
light,'
public
1
profoundly
distinction
which
inversion
'discovers
the
be
This
logic
disavowal,
informs
the
unhomely
moment.
For
sight'
for
Arendt,
becomes
Pateman's
Dis­
order
'ascriptive
domestic
sphere'
patriarchal,
This
results.
domestic
space
space
normalizing,
pastoralizing,
the
personal-is-the
political;
The
the
traumatic
ambivalences
psychic
history
to
the
the
child
mortality
rate
for
years
But
the
forms
existence
can
best
be
represented
in
language
itself;
which
allows
speak:
while
can
(be)
at
best,
a
the
silent
light,
To
the
truth,
those
lines
on
the
to
be,
as
suggestion
OF
CULTURE
autobiography
monkey
_ _
traditions
was
the
major
theme
can
now
suggest
that
transnational
histories
the
colonized,
or
political
refugees
-
these
conditions
-
may
be
the
terrains
literature.
The
centre
a
'sovereignty'
cultures,
universalism
focus
on
those
'freak
social
displacements'
represent
Which
leads
can
the
perplexity
unhomely,
intrapersonal
theme?
are
seeking
a
then
perhaps
it
lies
critical
act
the
sleight
which
litera­
ture
conjures
with
historical
specificity,
using
the
uncertainty,
-
realized
haunting'26
Read
the
relation
reality,
phrase
becomes
a
statement
political
responsibility
critic.
For
the
critic
realize,
responsibility
for,
the
unspoken,
unrepresented
pasts
historical
present.
remains,
however,
agency
formed
through
the
signifying
process;
how
the
historical
sented
discourse
suggestion
author
action
may
initiator
unique
meaning,
he
or
she
cannot
control
its
outcome.
It
house
contains
or
'controls'
with
a
specific
some chosen
subject,.
what
she
was,
there
to
be
discovered.
this
painterly
distance
emerges;
a
partial
or
double
climactic
political.moment
a
contingent
historical
experience
where
be
discovered.?"
They
recognize
her,
recognize
Words
will
silence
freezes
into
the
images
identity
cards,
police
frame-ups,
prison
mug-shots,
the
grainy
press
pictures
Aila
judged,
judgemental.
'Her
revenge
before
him,
to
be
the
hand,
these
small
gestures
through
which
she
speaks
describe
another
dimension
social
world.
Aila
a
boundary
once
inside
the
insider's
.outsideness.
The
stillness
that
the
gaps
story,
her
hesitation
we'll
have
to
The
lesson
Aila
teaches
requires
a
movement
away
from
a
world
conceived
terms,
away
from
people's
aspirations
black
and.
white.
requires
a
shift
from
the
political
pedagogical,
ideological
practice
to
politics
stressed
necessity
life
-
politics
leads
us
to
the
unhomely
Gordimer
writes,
the
banalities
are
enacted
-
the
fuss
over
births,
marriages,
family
affairs
with
their
survival
rituals
it
in
these
banalit­
ies
unhomely
stirs,
violence
racialized
complexity
state­
become
clearer
remind
you
stillness
through
which
Aila
surreptitiously
interrupts
going
presence
activity,
using
her
interstitial
role,
her
domestic
world
to
both
'obscure'
role
articulate.
continual
eruption
languages'
memory
obscures
the
historical
narrative
cide
only,
to
articulate
the
unspoken:
discourse
the
the
outside'
reveal
the
transitional
aftermath
1870s,
its
private
faces,
its
historical
narrative
present.
The
clothes
shops?
Levinas
the
'art-magic'
contemporary
novel
lies
way
inwardness
from
the
outside',
desire
For
Morrison,
the
signification
historical
boundaries
the
issue.
Racial
violence
by
historical
dates
-
1876,
for
instance
-
little
hasty
events
'in-themselves',
as
she
rushes
Fugitive
Bill,
the
from
'signified
upon':
they
are
the
victims
jected
fears,
Again
we
see
mate
act
struggle
to
the
slave
world.
against
the
the
overseer
which
were
resolved
within
the
household
context,
infanticide
as
against
the
system
least
acknowledged
the
public
sphere.
Infanticide
to
be
against
the
his
-
Fox-Genovese
concludes,
more
desperate
to
feel
that,
they
loved,
they
their
Levinasian
sense
the
subject
'radical
reference
to
the
other'.
This
knowledge
intriguing
other,
where
from
a
space
healing
a
com­
making
name.
finally
ask
ourselves:
Who
understand:
she
know:
she
people
with
broken
like
the
there
from
the
presence.
LOCATION
CULTURE
is
coming
I
have
to
have
it
I
for
the
join
I
join
I
is
join.
I
have
done,
the
phoenix,
pyre
is,
way,
to
as
I
said
earlier,
to
touch
the
future

located
the
public
nature
of
the
social
event
encounters
the
silence
its
historical
composure
to
recall
Walter
Benjamin's
insight
'Ambiguity
is
the
figurative
appearance
of
the
dialectic,
the
the
dialectic
standstill.'
Benjamin
is
those
described
it,
'otherwise'
it,
the
necessary
horizon
I
-
their
houses
erupted
-
slavery
.
-
through
obscurity
of
art,
into
a
second
coming.
Although
Morrison
insistently
repeats
is
story
to
she
does
this
only
engrave
the
event
deepest
resources
of
When
historical
visibility
present
tense
of
testimony
loses
its
arrest,
displacements
of
indirec­
tions
image
survival.
unhomely
world,
to
find
its
ambivalencies
enacted
house
of
fiction,
sundering
performed
art,
is
also
to
affirm
a
for
social
solidarity:
for
the
join
join
join.'
18
TO
THEORY
is
a
damaging
neces,.
language
of
the
socially
academic
critic
is
inevitably
within
the
The
Olympian
realms
of
mistakenly
labelled
assumed
to
where
the
representation
of
social
antagonisms
contradictions
can
take
no
other
form
binarism
of
theory
Can
the
aim
of
freedom
of
knowl­
edge
inversion
of
the
COunter-myth
vision
of
Being
that
seeks
to
transcend
the
contra­
dictions
that
constitute
the
very
structure
of
systems
of
cultural
representation?
the
radicaJ,
engaged,
see
the
mirror
image.
(albeit
reversed
in
content
the
name
pmgress,
self
round,
'critical
.and
.
is
insistently
identified
vagaries_
for instance,
LOCATION
of
discursive
World,
the
the
the
claims
to
a
spurious
there
is
a
sharp
growth
in
a
new
Anglo-American
nationalism
which
increasingly
articulates
its
economic
and
military
power
in
politi­
cal
acts
that
express
a
neo-imperialist
disregard
for
the
autonomy
of
peoples
and
places
in
the
Third
World.
Think
of
America's
'backyard'
policy
towards
the
Caribbean
and
Latin
America,
the
patriotic
gore
and
patrician
lore
of
Britain's
Falklands
Campaign
recently,
the
triumphalism
of
the
American
and
British
forces
during
the
Gulf
convinced
that
such
economic
and
political
domination
has
a
profound
hegemonic
influence
on
the
infor­
mation
orders
of
the
Western
world,
its
popular
media
and
its
special­
ized
institutions
and
academics.
is
not
in
doubt.
What
does
demand
further
discussion
poststructuralist,
deconstructionist.
necessarily
a
power
culturally
privileged
COMMITMENT
THEORY
to
large
film
festival
West
-
even
cultural
event
such
as
Edinburgh's
'Third
Cinema'
fails
to
reveal
the
disproportionate
influence
West
as
cultural
forum,
three
senses
word:
of
public
exhibition
as
place
British
Film
Institute.
article
important
history
of
neo-traditionalism
cinema
sees
the
major
contribu­
tors
to
Third
Cinema
as
precept
are
a
World
film-makers
exiles
West
problematically,
often
dangerously,
'left'
margins
Eurocentric,
bourgeois
liberal
culture.
I
I
names
ask
function
committed
is
identify
'object'
allegiance
-
the
Third
World,
the
working
class,
the
feminist
struggle.
Although
such
activity
is
crucial
inform
political
debate,
only
option
for
those
critics
committed
to
progressive
political
change
of
a
socialist
whose
different
effects
are
obscured
are
divided
the
event;
the
theory
makes
its
contri­
bution
to
those
ideas
and
principles
the
right
to
strike.
The
latter
does
the
former;
it
neces­
sarily
precede
side
with
the
one
enabling
the
recto
Hall,
the
notion
implies
a
politics
imaginary.
This
occupies
a
discursive
space
which
delimited
history
the
right
or
the
left.
somehow
a
movement
is
initiated
that
relation
forms,
then,
politics
complicated
formulation
I
have
tried
to
indicate
some­
thing
location
event
itself,
the
productivity
of
meanings
that
construct
counter­
the
very
act
within
the
.terms
negation)
[email protected]
the
act
discursive
the
of
the
history
of
state
'the
knowledge
-
political
or
otherwise
-
outside
representation.
suggest
dynamics
ity
require
His
crucial
chapter,
Liberty
cussion',
define
political
problem
a
form
of
emphases)
'rationality'
permits,
or
requires,
such
forms
to
enhance
his
vision
inherently
progressive
(This
makes
it
possible
for
contradictions
to
generates
a
sense
'whole
truth'
which
reflects
the
natural,
organic
true
always
reserves,
argument,
the
unreal
neutral
space
Third
representative
'people',
who
witnesses
the
debate
from
temological
distance'
a
reasonable
conclusion.
Even
attempt
to
describe
the
political
and
dialogue
-
process
enlightened
Mill,
against.thegrain,
suggests
that
politics
can
only
become
representative,
a
truly
public
discourse,
through
a
splitting
signification
subject
through
at
the
point
enunciation
politics.
I
have
chosen
to
demonstrate
the
importance
space
and
the
problematic
at
the
very
heart
liberal
tradition
because
it
that
the
myth
'transparency'
reasonableness
action
forcefully
asserted.
more.
radical
political
alternatives
of
the
left,
the
of
the
individual
the
social
is
still
substantially
thought
beliefs.
to
that
makes
'the
political'
possible.
a
perspective,
the
problematic
problem
and
reality
or
theory
and
practice
or
word
and
thing.
sented
dialectical
problem
or
a
symptomatic
contradiction
constitut­
materiality
'real'.
contrary,
we
are
made
e)(_cruciatingly
aware
ambivalent
juxtaposition,
the
relation
factual
and
the
projective,
and,
beyond
that,
crucial
function"
textual
and
the
THEORY
closure
real,
the
efficacy
thinking
in
the
discourses
to-and-fro,
this
symbolic
process
negotiation,
a
politics
Its
the
received
political
name·
free
play
signifier.
A
critical
discourse
does
not
yield
a
object,
or
aim,
or
knowledge,
which
a
master
the
Marxist,
the
extent
to
which
opposition
of
hybridity,
figuratively
the
alienates
expectations,
and
forms
moment
challenge
lies
time
action
and
understanding
ing
up
a
space
accept
the
differential
structure
moment
without
rushing
to
produce
a
unity
social
antagonism
or
contradiction.
sign
within
the
pages
within
the
systems
and
structures
we
construct
to
figure
the
passage
historical.
When
than
convey
a
to
articulation
elements:
a
dialectic
without
the
emergence
prE!scriptive
reading
where
tics
on
the
surface
reveal
the
'real
materialist
contradiction'
embod­
ies.
a
discursive
temporality,
the
event
becomes
the
instances
that
open
sites
and
destroy
those
negative
polarities
and
discursive
OF
CULTURE
being
explored
here.
I
attempt
to
to
the
structure
of
political
movements
that
attempt
to
articulate
antagonistic
elements
without
the
redemp­
tive
rationality
of
sublation
or
transcendence.
of
truth.
is
crucially
. a
radical
-
and
this
ary
feminism
Cinema
or
whatever,
whose
objects
of
priority
-
class
or
sexuality
or
'the
new
the
whole
history
of
socialist
throught
which
seeks
to
'make
it
new
politicaf
object
is
and
displaced
critical
act.
these
COMMITMENT
THEORY
contrary,
the
the
negotiation
of
socialist
democratic
poli­
tics
which
questions
of
organization
are
theori­
zed
theory
is
'organized',
right signs.
logic
political
through
that
accampanies
is
literally,
no
space
for
the
unitary
political
objective
which
would
offend
against
the
sense
of
socialist
interest
in
the
1980s,
struggle
was
fought
more
power­
fully,
more
poignantly,
values
of
a
socialist
community
than
the
miners'
strike
of
1984-5.
The
battalions
of
working
class.
The
choice
was
clearly
the
strike,
Beatrix
Campbell,
in
the
a
group
of
women
involved
strike.
clear
that
their
experience
of
the
historical
struggle,
their
understanding
of
the
historic
choice
was
startlingly
different
complex.
Their
testimonies
contained
simply
within
the
priorities
of
the
politics
of
class
histories
of
industrial
struggle.
Many
of
the
women
began
to
question
their
roles
within
the
family
community
-
the
two
central
institutions
which
articulated
the
meanings
of
the
the
labouring
classes
around
which
battle
Some
challenged
the
of
the
culture
they
fought
to
defend.
Others
disrupted
the
homes
they
to
sustain.
For
most
of
them
there
was
no
back
to
the
'good
old
days'.
It
would
be
simplistic
either
that
this
considerable
social
change
was
a
spin-off
from
the
class
OF
CULTURE
or
that
it
was
a
repudiation
of
the
politics
of
class
from
a
socialist-feminist
perspective.
There
is
political
or
social
truth
learned,
for
there
is
no
unitary
representation
of
a
political
agency,
hierarchy
of
political
values
of
the
rearticulation,
or
are
negotiation
where
each
formation
encounters
the
displaced,
differentiated
boundaries
of
its
group
rep­
resentation
sites
in
which
the
limits
and
limitations
of
social
power
are
encountered
in
an
agonistic
relation.
When
it
is
sug­
gested
that
the
British
Labour
seek
to
produce
a
socialist
alliance
among
progressive
forces
that
are
widely
dispersed
and
distri­
buted
across
a
range
of
class,
culture
forces
-
without
a
unifying
sense
of
the
class
for
itself
-
the
kind
hybridity
that
attempted
to
identify
is
being
acknowledged
as
a
historical
necessity.
a
little
less
its.majori.t)'.
improve
arid'
unskilled,
workers,
male
·of
class
consensus
represent
both
the
histori­
social
divisions,
structure
of
to
a
construct
a
new
.
a
form
syxnbolic
identification
The
Labour
Party,
traditionalist
image
-
white,
-
is
not
_hegemonic
enough,
He
is
right;
what
remains
unanswered
is
COMMITMENT
THEORY
has
two
significant
effects.
It
enables
Hall
to
see
the
agents
of
political
change
as
discontinuous,
divided
subjects
caught
interests
Equally,
historical
level
of
a
Thatcherite
population,
he
asserts
that
divisive
rather
forms
of
identi­
fication
are
the
rule,
resulting
in
undecidabilities
and
aporia
of
political
judgement.
What
does
a
working
woman
Which
of
her
identi­
ties
is
the
one
that
but,
as
I
see
it,
the
work
of
hegemony
is
itself
the
process
of
iteration
production
of
alternative
images
that
are
always
produced
side
and
in
-a
the
act
of
negotiation
be
interrogatory.
Can
such
movements,
which
display
forms
of
identification,
be
represented
in
a
the
language
of
the
date
vicissitudes-
of
its
representation,
its
construction
through
a
symbolic
majority
where
the
have-nots
identify
themselves
from
the
position
of
the
haves?
a
politics
based
a
displacement
of
affect
elaboration
(Foucault),
where
political
positioning
grounded
in
of
political
fan­
tasies
that
require
repeated
passages
across
the
differential
boundaries
OF
CULTURE
policy
of
hegemony
is,
quite
literally,
the
that
Laclau
have
turned
to
the
language
of
textuality
to
enunciative
modalities,
to
understand
the
structure
of
Gilroy
also
refers
to
Bakhtin's
theory
of
narrative
when
the
performance
of
black
expressive
an
attempt
to
transform
the
relationship
a
familiar
epistemologfcal
field
of
history.'
is
precisely
that
popular
binarism
Sartre
to
when
he
describes
the
com­
mitted
intellectual
as
the
theory.
not
foreclose
on
the
political,
even
though
battles
for
power-knowledge
may
or
lost
to
great
effect.
(or
socialist)
boundary
my.
resistance
to
the
the
as
radical
on
good
or
the
activist
agent
or
am
primarily
concerned
with
the
of
the
terms
-
the
COMMITMENT
THEORY
I
crucial
of
theory
theocy
'Western'?
It
a
designation
of
lo
o
within
the
f
anthropology
either
to
universalize
their
meaning
discourse,
internal
critique
of
logocentric
sign,
the
idealist
subject,
illusions
indeed,
the
certainty
form
represented,
its
object
indictment
·
·
OF
that
is
alive
to
the
ambivalent
structure
of
subjec­
tivity
Foucault's
archaeology
of
the
emergence
of
a
problem
of
finitude,
inextricable
from
its
afterbirth,
its
Other,
enables
the
linear,
progressivist
claims
of
the
social
sciences
-
the
major
imperializing
discourses
-
to
be
limitations.
These
arguments
of
analysis
can
as
internal
squabbles
around
Hegelian
causality,
psychic
rep­
resentation
theory.
Alternatively,
they
can
be
subjected
translation,
a
transformation
of
value
as
the
questioning
of
the
modernity
great,
revolutionary
tradition
of
-
or
Fanon,
psychoanalysis.
Fanon
that
differential
reading
of
Lacan's
Other
might
be
more
relevant
for
the
colonial
condition
Marxisant
reading
of
the
produce such
·

its
philosophical.
of
a
few
theory.
This
can
only
the
referential
demands
of
such
reorientation
in
the
historical
texts
of
the
colonial
moment
in
the
late
eighteenth
COMMITMENT
THEORY
in
their
opposition
the
desire
postcolonial
struggle
of
tl\eiilissionary
the
oppositional
voices
culture
hear
the
uncertain
process
transformation.
I
quote
from
influential
to
some
doctrine
which
to
to
Revel­
ation;
tell
the
people
that
they
again,
else
they
can
never
'see
God'.
Before
aware,
they
away
saying,
is
nothing
new
here;
our
tell
same
thing;
that
to
be
so.'
But
understand
expression?
It
is
that
they
are
to
be
other
form,
agreeably
to
their
trans­
births.
the
appearance
of
coun­
tenancing
so
absurd
a
doctrine,
you
vary
your
language,
them
that
there
second
they
happens
that
this,
similar
phraseology,
is
preoccupied.
The
sons
of
a
Brahman
have
to
undergo
various
purificatory
ceremonial
rites,
before
they
attain
to
full
Brahmanhood.
The
last
of
these
is
the
investiture
with
the
sacred
thread;
which
is
followed
com­
munication
of
the
Gayatri,
sacred
verse
in
the
ceremonial
constitutes,
'religiously
representation.
Here
the
word
of
divine
authority
is
deeply
flawed
assertion
of
the
indigenous
sign,
practice
incalculable
colonized
subject
half
oppositional,
always
untrustworthy
-
produces
problem
of
cultural
difference
for
the
very
address
of
colonial
cultural
authority.
The
'subtile
system
as
the
missionaries
early
OF
postenlighterunent
notion
of
the
'evidence
of
Christianity'
and
its
historical
priority,
which
was
central
to
evangelical
colonialism.
The
Word
could
to
carry
the
truth
when
written
or
spoken
colonial
world
European
missionary.
Native
cat­
had
to
be
found,
who
brought
with
them
their
own
cultural
ambivalences
often
under
great
pressure
from
their
families
This
revision
of
the
history
of
critical
theory
rests,
I
have
said,
on
the
notion
of
cultural
difference,
not
cultural
diversity.
Cultural
diversity
is
object
-
culture
as
an
object
of
empirical
knowledge
-
whereas
cultural
difference
is
the
process
of
the
culture
as
adequate
to
the
construction
of
sys­
tems
of
cultural
identification.
diversity
is
a
category
of
comparative
of
signification
through
which
statements
or
differentiate,
discriminate
the
production
of
fields
of
force,
reference,
applicability
Cultural
diversity
is
the
recognition
of
pre-given
cultural
contents
held
in
a
time-frame
of
relativism
it
gives
rise
to
liberal
notions
of
multiculturalism,
cultural
exchange
or
the
culture
of
humanity.
Cultural
diversity
is
also
the
representation
of
a
radical
a
mythic
memory
of
a
unique
collective
identity.
Cultural
diversity
emerge
as
a
system
of
the
articulation
cultural
signs
early
structuralist
accounts
of
anthropology.
Through
the
concept
of
cultural
difference
I
want
to
draw
attention
to
the
common
ground
and
lost
territory
of
contemporary
critical
debates.
For
they
all
recognize
that
the
problem
of
cultural
interaction
emerges
only
significatory
boundaries
of
cultures,
where
mean­
ings
and
values
are
(mis)read
or
signs
are
misappropriated.
Culture
only
emerges
as
a
problem,
or
a
problematic,
point
at
which
there
is
a
loss
of
meaning
in
the
contestation
of
everyday
life,
reality
of
the
limit
or
limit-text
of
culture
is
rarely
theorized
outside
of
well-intentioned
moralist
polemics
against
prejudice
or
cultural
t
to
dominate
in
the
itself
o y
it
is
the
very
authority
of
culture
as
a
knowledge
COMMITMENT
THEORY
referential
truth
which
is
in
the
concept
of
process
present
of
a
model,
a
tradition,
a
community,
a
stable
system
of
ecessa
strategies
in
the
political
present,
as
a
practice
of
resistance.
The
struggle
is
often
significatory
or
representational
undecidability:
But
[native
intellectuals]
colonial
struggle;
they
also
suggest
a
possible
critique
of
the
positive
LOCATION
CULTURE
is
not
because
of
some
humanistic
nostrum
that
beyond
individual
cultures
to
the
of
mankind;
nor
is
of
act
of
-
as
attitudes
to
symbolic
systems
within
different
cultures
than
with
the
structure
of
symbolic
represen­
tation
itself
-
not
the
content
of
the
symbol
social
function,
any
the
common
enunciation,
·
·
.
·
its
reference
to
a
present
pact
of
j;!assaie
tllrough
of
unconscious
relation
introduces
is
in
the
act
of
traditionally
authorize
the
subject
of
cultural
knowledge.
often
taken
for
granted
in
materialist
and
idealist
problematics
that
the
value
of
culture
as
of
study,
and
the
value
of
any
analytic
activity
that
is
considered
cultural,
lie
in
a
capacity
COMMITMENT
THEORY
produce
a
cross-referential,
generalizable
unity
that
signifies
a
of
ideas-in-time,
as
well
as
a
critical
self-reflection
premisses
validity
of
charac­
terization
of
the
Western
expectation
of
culture
as
a
disciplinary
practice
of
writing.
I
quote
Sahlins
point
to
define
the
difference
of
Western
bourgeois
culture:
to
functional
dominance
as
-
structures
of
symbolic
gross
difference
in
design
correspond
differences
in
symbolic
performance:
the
mirror
expanding
code.
Such
of
the
.the
People.
perceptively
describes
as
serial
time.
is
only
that
all
cultural
statements
are
space
that
:why
hierarchical
claims
to
the
vision
of
revolutionary
cultural
change
as
a
'fluc­
tuating
movement'
of
occult
instability
could
as
cul­
tural
of
this
·
·
e
meanmg
of
culture
have
·
moving
OF
their culture
-I
meditation
great
Guyanese
writer
void
of
misgiving
in
the
textuality
of
colonial
history
reveals
the
cultural
and
historical
dimension
of
that
Third
enunciations
which
I
have
made
the
precondition
for
the
articulation
difference.
He
sees
accompanying
the
'assimilation
of
contraries'
and
creating
that
occult
instability
which
presages
powerful
cultural
changes.
It
is
signifi­
cant
that
the
productive
capacities
of
this
Third
a
colonial
provenance.
For
a
willingness
to
descend
into
that
alien
territory
-
where
I
have
led
you
-
may
reveal
that
the
con-
ceptualizing
xoticism
of
m
and
remember
t
'inter'
-
the
cutting
edge
of
translation
the
burden
of
the
meaning
of
culture.
It
makes
to
begin
envisaging
national,
anti-nationalist
histories
COMMITMENT
the
'people'.
this
Third
may
elude
the
politics
of
polarity
as
the
others
IDENTITY
Fanon
and
the
postcolonial
prerogative
Fanon
is
to
experience
the
sense
that
prefigures
-
-
the
emergence
of
a
truly
radical
thought
that
never
dawns
without
casting
dark.
Fanon
is
the
purveyor
of
the
transgressive
truth.
He
may
yearn
for
the
total
transformation
of
Man
and
AraPdlgmtanently.
own
country,
social
struc-
IDENTITY
existing
to
to
individual
back
where
extremity
colonial
alienation
of
the
person
-
'idea'
of
the
individual
-
produces
a
restless
urgency
search
for
a
conceptual
form
appropriate
to
the
social
antagonism
colonial
relation.
The
psychoanalytic
ambivalence
of
the
Unconscious.
desperate,
doomed
search
for
a
dialectic
Fanon
explores
the
edge
modes
his
Hegelianism
restores
hope
to
history;
his
existentialist
evocation
the
presence
of
the
marginal­
ized;
his
psychoanalytic
framework
illuminates
of
racism,
the
pleasure
the
agonistic
fantasy
of
political
power.
As
Fanon
attempts
such
audacious,
often
impossible,
transformations
testimony
of
colonial
dislocation,
its
displacement
its
defilement
of
culture
refuses
the
ambition
of
theory
of
colonial
oppression.
The
Antillean
to
the
quick
glancing
look
frightened,
confused,
white
child;
the
stereotype
native
fixed
shifting
boundaries
Fanon's
vision?
I
believe,
from
the
tradition
of
the
oppressed,
the
language
of
a
revolutionary
awareness
that,
as
Walter
Benjamin
suggests,
is
exception
rule.
to
a
concept
with
state
of
emergency
is
also
always
a
state
of
the.
a
progressive,
analysis
order
of
Western
historicism
is
in
the
colonial
even
more
deeply
disturbed
is
the
social
representation
LOCATION
CULTURE
For
the
very
nature
of
humanity
becomes
estranged
colonial
condition
it
emerges,
not
as
of
as
of
freedom,
questioning.
With
a
question
that
echoes
Freud's
'What
turns
to
confront
the
colonized
world.
'What
does
a
he
asks,
in
the
introduction
to
Skin,
White
Masks;
does
the
black
loaded
question
where
cultural
alienation
bears
ambivalence
of
psychic
identification,
Fanon
responds
with
performance
of
self-images:
tom-toms,
. I
could
it
be
for
me
a
spattered
black
blood?
the
u
the
black
man's
b
act
of
epistemic
its
own
frame
of
reference
is
transgressed,
its
field
of
vision
disturbed.
'What
does
the
black
insists,
and
in
privileging
psychic
dimension
he
not
only
changes
the
very
means
we
recognize
and
identify
its
is
not
principally
posing
the
question
of
political
oppression
as
the
violation
of
a
although
he
lapses
into
such
a
lament
more
existential
moments.
He
is
the
question
of
colonial
man
in
the
universalist
.
addressed
not
a
a
unitary
concept
of
and
qualities
Skin,
White
Masks
it
colonial
experience.
There
is
narrative
background
of
social
facts
against
which
emerge
the
problems
of
the
individual
psyche.
traditional
sociological
alignment
of
Self
IDENTITY
rendered
questionable
in
Fanon's
identification
of
the
colonial
subject
who
in
the
image
-
ose
borders of
the
formation
of
both
individual
authority
as
they
come
to
be
developed
in
the
discourse
of
social
sovereignty.
The
social
virtues
of
historical
rationality,
cultural
cohesion,
the
autonomy
of
individual
consciousness
assume
Utopian
identity
with
the.
subjects
on
whom
they
confer
a
civil
status.
The
civil
state
ultimate
expression
of
the
innate
authority
in
the
representative
structure
of
a
General
or
Culture
-
where
or
that
results
in
'archaic
inert
institutions
ction]
under
the
oppressor's
super-
formerly
e
violence
very
e
·
o
social
space;
or
the
viability
of
the
febrile,
phantasmic
images
of
racial
hatred
that
come
to
be
absorbed
out
wisdom
of
the
indeed
collaborations
of
political
violence
virtue,
alienation
within
identity,
drive
Fanon
to
describe
the
split­
ting
of
the
colonial
space
of
consciousness
and
OF
CULTURE
representative
figure
of
such
a
perversion,
I
suggest,
is
the
image
of
post-Enlightenment
by,
his
dark
reflection,
the
shadow
of
colonized
man,
that
splits
his
presence,
distorts
his
outline,
breaches
his
boundaries,
repeats
his
action
distance,
disturbs
the
very
time
of
his
being.
The
ambivalent
identification
of
the
racist
world
-
moving
without
being
in
the
least
embarrassed
as
Sartre
says
of
the
anti-Semitic
con­
sciousness
-
idea
of
his
alienated
image;
not
Self
the
it
is
that
bizarre
figure
of
desire,
which
splits
along
the
axis
it
compels
Fanon
to
psychoanalytic
question
of
the
desire
of
the
subject
to
the
historic
con­
colonial
man.
is
writes.
speaks
otherwise.
that
enacts
fragile
and
white
individqftl
.
of
desire
being
in
relation
to
reaches
Rose
writes,
object.Jt
basis
for
is
visible
in
the
exchange
of
looks
m
he
the
n a
the
'
.
space
possession
that
in
the
tension
his
place
in
e
slave's
'Black
skin,
two
abandonment
neurotic,
Fanon
claims)JQ
1'!cJdcml!w:
a
doctor,
a
writer,
a
student,
you're
one
of
IDENTITY
object
that
1 m
its
never
the
affirmation
of
a
i
entity,
never
a
-
that
is,
to
-
from
the
preceding
illustrationsL
it
comes.
For
Fanon,
like
Lacan,
the
primary
moments
of
such
a
the
electric
his
creatures
make
him
come
before
you.
missing
person,
trust
no
Eng.
puffs
narrows
his
eyes,
scratches
his
fangs.
Caliban
is
still
faintly
pencilled
behind
a
shirt
of
paint,
fangs
cancelled.
that
voice
falters
its
echo
in
the
verse
of
a
black
woman,
descendant
of
slaves,
writing
of
the
diaspora:
in
the
Northern
Hemisphere
OF
CULTURE
the
Plantation.
a
straggle
bunch
of
immigrants
in
a
lily
white
landscape.
One
learnt
a
. . .
of
Other,
is
neither
the
glassy
essence
of
Nature,
to
use
Richard
Rorty's
image,
nor
the
leaden
voice
of
'ideological
interpel­
lation',
as
Louis
Althusser
suggests.
What
is
so
graphically
enacted
in
the
moment
of
colonial
identification
is
the
splitting
of
the
subject
in
its
historical
place
of
utterance:
him
come
before
you/To
invisible
a
missing
person,/trust
emphases).
What
these
repeated
negations
of
identity
dramatize,
in
their
elision
of
the
seeing
eye
that
must
contemplate
what
is
missing
or
invisible,
IDENTITY
the
ego,
equivalence
whereby the
see
the
process
visionary,
authorial
ideologies
ence'
accounts
history
look
that
cannot
'see
a
tic
the
Self.
of
the
missing
is
to
emphasize
a
a
that
its
privileged
enunciatory
position
a
to
position
of
absence,
its
the
the
at)
of
faintly
a
shirt,
a
trendy
your
come
screaming
a
discursive
place
questions
are
strategically
posed.
Through
the
progress
OF
continually
positioned
space
where
the
otherness
of
identity
is
the
anguished
the
Self
of
agony
that
emerges
look
perilously
through
a
glass
darkly.
What
is
profoundly
unresolved,
even
erased,
in
the
discourses
of
poststructuralism
is
that
which
the
authen­
ticity
of
identity
comes
to
glassy
frame
of
identity
from
the
field
of
vision
space
of
writing
interrogates
the
that
gives
profundity
representation
of
Self
-
that
perspective
that
cineastes
call
the
forth
wall;
literary
theorists
describe
the
transparency
of
realist
'profound,
geological
dimension'
signification,
achieved
the
linguistic
sign
The
bilateral
space
of
the
symbolic
consciousness,
Barthes
writes,
massively
privileges
signified
-
that
conceptual
space
that
is
placed
prior
to,
of,
the
act
of
signifi­
cation.
From
of
view,
this
verticality
is
significant
for
the
light
it
sheds
provides
the
language
of
Identity
sense
of
measure
of
the
emerges
from
of
the
the
profundity
of
to
mention
only
a
few
of
those
qualities
through
which
articulate
My
the
importance
of
representation
of
a
unified
image
of
the
self
is
borne
most
decisive
formulation
in
the
English
empiricist
tradition.
John
Locke's
famous
criteria
for
the
continuity
of
legitimately
regiSter
resemblance
analogy.
For
the
sameness
of
·
'as
as
this
.
so
far
reaches
·of-that-person'··"'
precisely
IDENTITY
same
person,
emphasis).
description
of
the
sign-as-symbol
is
conveniently
analogous
to
the
language
to
designate
identity.
At
the
same
time,
it
sheds
light
as
mirrors
of
selfhood
Western
.
believe
when
our
primary
relation
to
is
analogous
the
self
that
develops
in
the
symbolic
consciousness
of
the
sign.
discursive
space
from
which
(initially
as
an
assertion
of
the
authenticity
of
lingers
on
to
reverberate
-
a
questioning
of
identity.
My
purpose
here
is
to
define
the
space
of
the
inscription
or
writing
of
the
visual
depths
of
Barthes's
symbolic
sign.
The
experience
of
the
disseminating
self-image
goes
beyond
representation
as
the
analogical
consciousness
of
resemblance.
not
a
form
of
dialectical
contradiction,
the
antagonistic
consciousness
of
master
that
can
be
sublated
The
impasse
or
aporia
of
consciousness
that
seems
to
be
the
representative
postmodernist
experi­
ence
is
a
peculiar
strategy
of
doubling.
self
of
most
important
-
strategy
of
the
moment
of
interrogation,
a
moment
OF
CULTURE
of
the
symbolic
consciousness
the
sign
of
identity
its
integrity
spatialization
of
the
subject,
that
is
occluded
in
the
of
have
called
the
of
the
image
of
identity.
The
figure
of
the
double
-
to
which
I
within
the
analogical
sign
of
resem­
blance;
as
this
developed
its
totemic,
vertical
dimension
only
because
sign
is
the
signified:
the
signifier
is
always
a
poststructuralist
priority
(and
play)
of
the
signifier
reveals
the
space
of
doubling
(not
depth)
that
is
the
articulatory
of
discourse.
of
enunciation
that
problems
of
meaning
enter
the
the
problematic
of
subjection
What
emerges
preceding
poems,
as
the
line
drawing
of
trendy
eerie,
avengeful
disembodied
eye,
as
a
revelation
of
some
suppressed
truth
of
the
postcolonial
psyche/subject.
double
inscriptions
that
space
of
can
immediacy
of
a
visualist
perspective,
no
such
face-to-face
epiphanies
nature.
level,
the
reader,
in
the
the
postcolonial
uncannily
Other:
disturbance
of
look
enacts
the
complexity
of
to
see,
to
in
a
contain­
able,
desire
which
so
that
are
is
sufficient
unto
itself.
As
I
have
just
shown
in
the
the
missing
person,
the
of
identi­
fication
emerges
the
agonistic
struggle
knowledge
of
the
Other,
representation
in
the
act
of
Look,
a
see
the
Negro!
. . .
points,
the
crumbled,
its
place
taken
racial
epidermal
schema
no
longer
a
question
of
being
aware
of
triple
was
responsible
for
IDENTITY
of
being,
psychoanalytic
problem
of
identification
that
always
begs
the
question
of
the
subject:.
'What
The
as
socially
authenti­
depends
narrative
of
fulfilment,
or
of
coincidence
binary,
two-part,
identities
function
in
a
kind
of
narcissistic
reflection
of
the
One
Other,
confronted
language
of
desire
psychoanalytic
process
of
identification.
For
identifi­
cation,
identity
is
never
priori,
finished
product;
only
ever
the
problematic
process
of
access
to
of
totality.
The
discursive
conditions
of
this
psychic
image
of
identification
clarified
the
perilous
perspective
of
the
concept
of
the
image
itself.
For
the
image
-
as
point
of
identification
-
marks
the
Its
representation
always
spatially
split
-
of
otherness
within
identity,
that
Fanon
asks:
a
When
resistance
from
the
other,
self-consciousness
undergoes
the
experience
of
desire
soon
as
to
be
considered.
merely
here
sealed
into
thingness.
somewhere
else
and
for
emptiness
of
nausea
Fanon
makes
his
answer:
the
black
place
of
OF
CULTURE
that.
introduces
Emablesthe
cultUral
to.be:sigi:Ufied
I
have
suggested,
the
subject
of
·
a
Myself,
then
the
Other
is
never
simply
front
of
identity,
truth
As
a
principle
of
identification,
the
Other
bestows
a
degree
of
objec­
tivity,
representation
-
social
process
of
the
Law
psychic
process
of
the
Oedipus
-
is
always
ambivalent,
disclosing
a
lack.
For
instance,
the
common,
conversational
distinction
the
ambivalence
the
aesire
a
performance
of
the
of
the
subject
is
enacted
the
poems
I
have
quoted;
it
is
evident
in
the
play
of
phantasmic
rage
erases
the
naturalistic
identities
of
I
narrate
a
more
conven­
tional,
even
realist
history
of
colonial
exploitation
eyes
that
remain
-
the
eyes
as
a
kind
of
process
-
cannot
this
plenitudinous
renewal
of
time
They
are
the
signs
of
a
structure
of
a
the
produces
the
hybridity
of
race
in
the
postcolonial
discourse.
The
elision
of
identity
tropes
of
the
CULTURE
subject,
they
cannot
identify
identity
as
they
are
created
ambivalence
double
time
that,
felicitous
phrase,
'baffles
the
process
by
dislocating
any
orderly
time
at
the
center
present'."
The
effect
baffling,
poems,
initiate
a
principle
signification
self
such
can
be
or
transcendence
The
naming
person
as
'Savage
paint'
case
The
phrase,
spoken
at
the
end
[
ussawalla's
poem,
neither
simply
name postmodernist.
understood
follows
calls
the
logic
or
play
'supplement':
represents
an
image,
it
the
anterior
default
presence.
Compensatory
the
supplement
[evil
eye]
adjunct,
a
subaltern
instance
which
person]
produces
its
place
structure
mark
emptiness.
Somewhere
explains
contemporary
.
understanding
forms
based
on
their
structures
-
Fanon's
Manichaean
structure
-
articulated
within
different
temporal,
cultural
and
power
relations.
The
subaltern
instance
subverts
any
binary
or
sublatory
ordering
and
sign;
it
defers
the
object
look
-
'as
even
now
you
see
me'
-
and
endows
it
with
a
strategic
motion,
which
here,
analogously,
name
the
movement
death
drive.
The
evil
eye,
which
OF
CULTURE
-
fold
differ­
ence
-
the
'I'
initial,
initiatory
signature
subject;
'eye'
(in
its
eyes
will
remain
to
haunt,
to
chaos.
It
overlapping
space
concerns
time,
not
content.
Whereas
West
wants
from
autonomy,
invention,
novelty,
contrary,
case
may
form
or
problem
Lacan
produces
a
startling
reading.
The
two
still
figures
stand
at
the
centre
world,
.accoutre­
ments
globe,
a
lute,
books
and
compasses,
unfolding
wealth.
They
also
stand
moment
instantaneity
where
the
Cartesian
subject
emerges
subjectifyingrelation
foreground
(violating
the
meaningful
depths
flat
spherical
object,
obliquely
angled.
away
from
the
portrait
to
leave,
disc
skull,
the
reminder
(and
remainder)
visible
nothing
more
alienation
subject;
the
anamorphic
ghost.
the
logic
giggle
it
Osiris,
cough,
once
But
the
to
stay.
St.
Pancras
station,
the
Indian
railways.
learn
it
today.
then,
the
agency
postcolonial
first
which marks
demotic
English
signifier
-
'er,
a
cough'.
difference
culture
lated
as
a
itself-
to
be
represented
by
processes
very
vicariously
-
Other.
This
erases
any
essentialist
claims
for
the
or
which,
naturalistic
sign
consciousness
frequently
become
political
the
relief,
colonial
subject
IDENTITY
inscribed
schematic,
poststructuralist
joke
-
words,
-
linguistic
insistence
Geertz's
influential
experience
grasping
a
proverb,
catching
a
joke
[or
as
I
reading
a
poem]
insistence
on
locating
the
postcolonial
subject
play
subaltern
instance
develop
Derrida's
history
decentred
subject
dislocation
picking
their
looking
for
lost.
You're.
lost
office
to
claim
you
back.
You're
polluting
You're
so
rude.
difficult
to
cultural,
territorial
-
these
verses
speak.
Where
do
line
missing
'subaltern'
Derridean
sense,
the
sense
gives
the
concept:
an
autonomy,
subjected
to
the.
influence
or
group,
position.'37
LOCATION
CULTURE
concepts
of
the
subaltern,
as
I
read
it,
is
a
strategy
of
ambivalence
in
the
structure
of
identification
that
occurs
precisely
in
the
elliptical
the
displaced
peoples
who
pick
through
the
refuse,
constant
reminder
to
the
postimperial
West,
of
the
hybridity
of
its
mother
tongue,
and
the
unconscious
fantasy
phantoms
of
racist
fear
and
hate
that
stalk
the
colonial
scene;
he
turns
from
the
ambivalences
of
identification
to
the
antagonistic
identities
of
political
alienation
and
cultural
discrimination.
There
are
times
when
he
is
too
quick
to
name
the
Other,
to
personalize
its
presence
in
the
language
of
colonial
racism
continue
to
cultural
space
can,
at
times,
blunt
the
edge
of
Fanon's
brilliant
illustrations
of
the
complexity
of
the
psychic
projections
in
the
pathologi­
cal
colonial
relation.
Jean
Veneuse,
the
Antillean
not
merely
to
the
place
of
the
white
man
seeks
to
look
back
and
from
that
position.
Equally,
the
white
racist
cannot
merely
deny
fears
it
on
'them'.
Fanon
IDENTITY
authorize
its
projections.
The
compulsive,
fantasmatic
identifi­
cation
with
a
persecutory
'they'
is
accompanied,
even
undermined,
of
the
racist
projects.
Fanon's
sociodiagnostic
psychiatry
tends
to
explain
away
the
ambiva­
lent
turns
the
politics
of
race
be
entirely
contained
within
the
humanist
myth
of
economic
progress,
for
its
psychic
affects
question
such
forms
of
. . .
Fanon's
insight
into
the
dark
side
of
man,
such
a
deep
hunger
for
humanism
for
the
closed
narcissism'
to
which
he
attributes
the
depersonalization
of
colonial
man:
'There
one
lies
body,
with
one's
blackness
whiteness
cry,
each
sealed
into
his
own
particu­
true,
now
a
flash
this
flash
of
recognition
-
in
its
Hegelian
sense
with
its
transcendental,
sublative
spirit
-
that
fails
to
ignite
in
the
colonial
relation
where
there
is
only
narcissistic
indifference:
his
humanity.'
absence
of
such
a
imitate,
a
the
child
holds
the
father.
-
in
of
paranoic
identification
alternatin
b
een
·
However,
Fanon's
Hegelian
dream
for
a
ironized,
even
mocked,
view
of
the
Manichaean
structure
of
colonial
consciousness
non-dialectical
division.
What
he
says
OF
the
service
higher
unity.
No
conciliation
he
concludes,
for
two
terms
one
No,
there
can
reconciliation,
no
Hegelian
recognition,
no
simple,
humanistic
You'.
be
life
Politics
dream
the
sug­
gests
the
trajectory
desire
-
bizarre
colonial
figure,
the
exacerbates
the
edge
reveals
are
twinned.
For
denial
a
a
has
left
its
traumatic
mark.
lurks
the
white-masked
black
man;
such
ambivalent
identification
-
black
skin
white
masks
-
I
believe,
io
redeem
the
pathos
into
a
strategy
We
with
Fanon
the
racial
black
no
time
to
make
provocative
thought.
two
places
at
once
-
or
three
case
-
the
depersonalized,
dislocated
colonial
subject
can
become
an
incalculable
object,
quite
literally
difficult
to
place
its
message
nor
simply
strategy
desire
stage
the
the
the
black
reveal
the
white
skin.
At
the
edge,
it
lesson
the
Algerian
course
revolution
crossed
the
Manichaean
lines
to
claim
essay
'Algeria
unveiled'
the
colonizer's
attempt
to
unveil
the
Algerian
turn
the
veil
into
a
symbol
it
becomes
a
technique
a
means
-
the
veil
conceals
bombs.
The
veil
secured
the
home
-
the
limits
now
masks
the
activity,
linking
the
Arab
city
quarter,
transgressing
the
familial
boundary.
As
the
veil
public
sphere,
circulation
OF
CULTURE
difference,
the
need
for
Fanon
becomes
urgent
political
groups
from
different
directions,
refuse
to
homogen­
ize
their
oppression,
common
cause,
a
public
image
identity
the
need
for
Fan
on
becomes
urgent
-
urgent,
in
remind
us
engagement
play
form
dation,
the
being
gives
or
receives
from
the
other,
time
has
come
to
my
lead
from
the
subaltern
instance,
charge
politics
subject
results
vacuous
apocalypse
a
response
to
the
poststructuralist
probing
notion
negation
-
or.
sublation
-
thinking.
The
subaltern
or
strategic
contingent,
with
the
countervailing
to
negotiate
its
goals
through
an
acknowledgement
objects
levels
articulated
not
simply
or
narrative
-
be
they
governmental,
judicial
or
artistic.
Despite
its
firm
commitments,
the
political
pose
problem,
or
a
ques­
tion,
the
authority
to
become
autocratic.
left
are
to
people
are
a
conjugation
harmonious
Law.
We
can
dispute
the
political
radical,
masses
represent
a
certain
objectification
historical
process,
or
stage,
transformation.
What
remains
to
be
OTHER
or of
featw:e
its
dependence_
!=oncept
ideological
construction
of
sign
of
cultural/historical/rac:ial
difference
paradoxical
mode.
of
well
as
major
of
knowledge
that
vacillates
. . .
c n e
chapter
explores
cts
eory
it
is
the
force
colonifl
its
con·
·
its
strategies
of
individuation
ati
roduc:es
that
effect
o
pro
a
e m
proved
constn!ed:
function
of
to
be
charted.
of political
QUESTION
.of
that
the
point
of
intervention
should
shift
from
the
ready
recog­
to
.
plausible)
the
stereotyped
image
.potitical
is
to
dismiss
it,
not
to
displace
it,
which
is
only
possible
by
engaging
with
its
the
repertoire
of
positions
of
power
domination
that
constructs
colonial
identification
subject
(both
colonizer
and
colonized).
I
do
not
intend
to
deconstruct
the
colonial
discourse
to
reveal
its
ideological
misconceptions
to
exult
self-reflexivity,
indulge
its
liberatory
'excess'.
In
order
to
understand
the
productivity
of
colonial
power
it
is
o _
·
-
a
reading
a
transgression
of
these
limits
from
the
space
of
that
otherness.
becomes
crucial
in
both
the
economy
of
wish
to
conflate,
unprob­
marking
-
and
splitting
-
of
the
subject
globalize
two
forms
of
representation.
I
suggest,
however,
,!here
sense
that
denies
:_·sexuaCor-
taken,
as
Feuchtwang
argues
different
follows
demanding
a
specific
effects.
I
believe,
the
moment
of
inform
the
discursive
and
political
practices
of
racial
hierarchization.
to
the
construction
of
colonial
discourse,
I
want
to
discuss
briefly
forms
OF
the
passage
'from
work
to
text'
the
arbitrary,
differential
construction
of
social
and
cultural
signs,
these
critical
strategies
the
than
masterly
analysis
of
the
chiaroscuro
world
of
Welles's
classic,
refer
to
an
area
of
its
analysis
which
has
generated
the
least
comment,
that
is,
Heath's
attention
to
the
structuration
of
the
circulates
through
the
of
identify_
nationaliStic
idej}![!J.-·Reatn
the
diverse
sites
within
the
textual
system,
which
cultural
differences
in
their
deployment
of
the
semes
of
'foreignness',
'mixedness',
transgressive
and
corrupting,
is
extremely
relevant.
to
the
turnings
of
this
much
neglected
subject
as
sign
(not
symbol
or
in
the
codes
(as
'partition',
'exchange',
'naming',
'character',
awareness
of
the
multiple
or
cross-cutting
.
of
modes
of
sexual
and
racial
differentiation
there
is
a
the
sign
of
is
not
that
I
am
not
aware
of
the
that
'feminist'
focus.
The
'entertainment'
operated
realist
Hollywood
the
always
also
a
containment
of
the
subject
in
a
narrative
economy
of
voyeurism
is,
nevertheless,
a
that:
Vargas
is
the
position
of
desire,
its
admission
prohibition.
Not
surprisingly
he
has
names:
the
name
of
desire
is
Mexican,
Miguel
of
the
Law
American
-
Mike
the
border,
the
play
which
in
a
version
of
Law
QUESTION
liberatory
from
one
position
to
see
the
logic
of
the
text
traced
ceaselessly
of
the
American
border
as
cultural
signifier
of
a
pioneering,
male
'American'
spirit
always
under
threat
from
races
beyond
the
border
or
frontier.
death
of
the
Father
is
the
the
narrative
is
initiated,
it
is
through
that
death
that
miscegenation
is
both
possible
it
is
the
purpose
of
the
narrative
to
restore
Susan
as
'good
also
becomes
its
project
to
deliver
Vargas
from
his
racial'mixedness'.
These
questions
of
race
have
issue
of
the
problems
of
'Racism,
colonialism
-a
would
draw
attention
to
Julianne
Burton's
'The
politics
of
produces
reading
of
Hirzman's
a
specific
riposte
in
'Colonialism,
racism
with
a
useful
Brechtian
emphasis
politicization
of
the
representation,
specifically
point-of-view
But
despite
the
shift
objectives
OF
contradictory
indeed,
therefore,
a
simplification
ical
representation
knock-on
effect
central
They
operate
a
passive
is
a
complex,
ambivalent,
contradictory
as
assertive,
/
objectives
of
analysis
itself.
difference
is
other
desire.
These
construcied;"represenftluit-offiemess.
sliding
from
that,
proceeds
otherness
difference
discourse
however,
take
to
cations
of
discourse.
IPtion._and_."disavow.al
.
.oL
of
a
space
for
which
are
stereotypical
the
colonial
dis-
course
subjects
(for
example,
effects
of
class,
gender,
ideology,
different
social
formations,
varied
systems
form
despite
system
crucial
to
its
exercise
a
QUESTION
a
form
ffie
are
reformed
is
intervene
within
of
representation
and.
Said's
is
revealing
of,
to,
colonial
discourse:
Philosophically,
then,
language,
thought,
orientalism
very
generally
employing
orientalism,
which
is
the
habit
for
dealing
objects,
qualities
deemed
Oriental,
will
designate,
name,
talking
which
then
is
considered
either
to
have
acquired,
simply
to
_
the
copula
seems
to
western
rational­
the
boundaries
of
sense
for
itself.
too,
aware
continually
a
static
system
essentialism',
a
knowledge
of
stability'
such
encyclopaedic.
narrative,
about
the
Orient
which
originality
of
this
pioneering
theory
could
to
engage
alterity
of
Orientalist
discourse.
this
threat
a
binarism
within
the
argument
which,
Orientalism
the
uncon­
imaginative
writings
ideas;
OF
.called
produces
a
problem
with
Said's
use
of
Foucault's
concepts
of
power
The
productivity
of
Foucault's
concept
of
lies
refusal
of
an
epistemology
which
opposes
essence/
appearance,
ideology/science.
subjects
relation
of
power
that
is
not
a
can
then
be
sub­
verted
always
disproportionately
placed
or
domination
through
the
symbolic
decentring
of
multiple
power
relations
which
play
the
role
of
support
as
well
as
of
latent
Orientalism.
Equally,
it
is
difficult
to
conceive
of
the
process
of
subjectification
as
a
placing
or
colonial
the
dominated
subject
without
the
dominant
being
stra­
tegically
placed
within
it
too.
The
terms
in
which
is
unified
-
the
intentionality
of
colonial
power
-
also
subject
of
colonial
enunciation.
This
results
inadequate
attention
to
representation
as
a
con­
cept
that
articulates
the
historical
(as
the
scene
of
desire)
in
the
production
of
the
'political'
effects
of
discourse.
He
rightly
rejects
a
notion
of
Orientalism
as
the
misrepresentation
of
essence.
However,
having
introduced
the
concept
of
'discourse'
he
does
not
face
the
problems
it
creates
for
notion
of
power
brings me
OTHER
schema
for
the
colonial
subject
the
royal
road
to
colonial
fantasy.
There
is
passage
across
text,
I
take
up.
this:
the
fable,
the
stereotype,
the
polemical
confrontation.
These
are
the
lenses
the
Orient
is
experienced,
shape
perception,
of
the
encounter
Does
the
Freudian
fable
given
historical
LOCATION
The
force
of
a
articulate
writes:
the
apparatus
is
essentially
of
a
strategic
nature,
which
means
assuming
that
a
matter
of
a
certain
manipulation
of
relations
of
forces,
either
developing
them
particular
direction,
blocking
them,
stabilising
them,
utilising
them,
thus
in
the.
for
the
reading
of
the
stereotype
of
to
the
colonial
stereotype
functions
to
'normalize'
the
multiple
beliefs
and
split
subjects
that
constitute
colonial
discourse
as
a
consequence
of
its
process
of
disavowal.
The
scene
of
-
the
of
the
each
effect
calls
reworking
is
both
a
structural
and
functional
justification
for
racial
stereotype
of
colonial
discourse
of
Said
establishes
the
absence
and
presence
realm
of
the
Symbolic
-
is
disavowed
fixation
that
masks
that
difference
The
terms:
'All
men
have
penises';
'All
men
have
the
same
Freud
'Some
have
penises';
for
us
not
have
the
same
the
QUESTION
has
a
fundamental
the
of
is
always
threatened
division,
for
the
subject
to
be
engendered,
to
of
subjectification
onial
for
b()th
colonizer
is
the
scene
of
a
desire.for
.an.originaUty.
:which
of
race,
colour
My
contention
is
splendidly
caught
subject
into
a
'doubling' that
is
fixated
form
of
representation
play
of
difference
(which
the
negation
through
the
Other
for
the
the
subject
psychic
relations.
in
the
_stereotyped,
gives
further
credence
to
.
aJ1gc;iptes
in
a
solely
negating
of
is
denied
the
colonial
subject,
colonizer
form
of
negation
which
gives
access
to
the
recognition
of
of
difference
which
the
the
fixations
of
racial
typology,
of
of
racial
dominance
he
goes',
Fanon
despairs,
'the
Negro
remains
(
a
Ne.gro'
becomes
the
ineradicable
sign
of
discourses.
For
impedes
the
circulation
of
the
'race'
as
anything
other
already
know
that
blacks
are
licentious,
Asiatics
duplicitous
are
two
'primal
scenes'
myths
of
the
origin
of
the
marking
of
the
subject
within
the
racist
OF
CULTURE
of
a
colonial
culture.
occasion
a
white
girl
fixes
Fanon
look
as
she
turns
to
identify
with
her
mother.
a
scene
which
echoes
endlessly
through
his
essay
'The
fact
of
blackness':
'Look,
a
Negro
see
the
Negro!
'What
else
could
it
be
for
as points
are
enacted
drive
that
represents
the
pleasure
which
has
the
look
as
its
object
of
desire,
is
related
both
to
the
myth
of
primal
scene,
the
problematic
of
QUESTION
takes place
assumes
a
which,
as
a
form
of
multiple
belief,
gives
knowl­
edge
of
difference
disavows
it.
Like
the
'the
fullness'
of
the
stereotype
-
its
image
-
is
always
threatened
The
construction
of
colonial
discourse
is
then
a
complex
articulation
of
the
tropes
of
The
taking
any
one
position,
within
a
specific
discursive
form,
in
a
particular
historical
conjuncture,
is
thus
always
problematic
-
the
site
of
a
colonial
'identity'
that
is
played
like
all
fantasies
of
-
in
the
face
of
the
disruption
from
the
_multiple
the
other
process
of
the
Negro's
animality,
the
Coolie's
inscrutability
stupidity
of
the
Irish
told
(compulsively)
again
differently
gratify­
ing
each
time.
specific
colonial
discourse
the
of
power
whicfi
OF
CULTURE
otherness
that
I
have
called
. . .
four-term
strategy
of
the
stereotype
tries
tentatively
to
provide
a
structure
process
for
the
'subject'
of
a
colonial
discourse.
I
take
problem
of
discrimination
as
the
political
effect
of
such
a
discourse
it
to
the
question
of
'race'
is
important
to
remember
that
the
multiple
belief
that
accompanies
a
public
the
racial
drama
that
is
enacted
every
colonial
QUESTION
loved to
-
argument
relies
particular
reading
of
the
problematic
of
representation
which,
Fanon
suggests,
is
specific
to
the
colonial
situation.
He
writes:
the
originality
of
the
colonial
context
is
that
the
economic
substruc-
is
also
a
superstructure
are
rich
because
you
are
white,
white
because
you
are
rich.
This
is
analysis
always
be
slightly
................................
"
-
the
notion
that
ideology
as
miscognition,
is
the
repression
of
the
real).
then
to
the
of
as
Abbot
very
different
context,
whereas
banishes
its
object
into
the
unconscious,
presence
of
the
very
difference
which
is
also
its
object.
difference:
'this
repression
of
\
the
recognition
of
OF
CULTURE
is
contrived
as
precisely
the
kind
of
attributed
to
the
the
as
the
inferiority
skin
as
its
natural
Abbot's
account
stops
point
of
'identification'
colludes
with
the
discriminatory
practices
gesting
that
their
representations
repression
of
the
working­
difference;
to
argue
otherwise,
according
to
him,
would
be
to
subject
awareness,
since
consciousness
the
the
extent
to
which
the
discrimination
is
deemed
natural
What
Abbot
neglects
is
the
facilitating
role
of
contra­
diction
role
of
discriminatory knowledges
'presence
of
difference',
is
to
provide
a
process
of
splitting
belief
point
of
this
crucial
splitting
of
the
ego
which
is
represented
description
of
the
construction
of
the
colonized
subject
as
effect
of
stereotypical
discourse:
best understood
simUltaneously
embracing
two
contradictory_
.one
progressive,
that
allows
the
myth
of
defence
in
QUESTION
lasting
matrix,
the
effective
prototype
of
splittings
of
belief
which
henceforth
of
in
the
most
domains,
of
all
infinitely
complex
unconscious
conscious
interactions
which
he
will
allow
himself
is
a
identity
a
as
black
-
I
called
the
play
there
iii\aginary
which
substitution
the
recognition
of
'difference'
is
always
disturbed
question
of
its
re-presentation
The
that
very
reason,
the
exertions
of
the
'official
knowledges'
of
colonialism
-
pseudo-scientific,
typological,
legal-administrative,
eugenicist
-
are
imbricated
at
the
point
of
their
production
of
meaning
with
the
fantasy
that
dramatizes
the
for
a
pure,
undifferen­
tiated
origin.
the
desire
syntax
of
the
scenario
Fanon
fantasies
of
the
productions
desire'
mark
the
discourse
as
the
most
primitive
into
problem
of
origin
as
the
problematic
of
racist,
stereotypical
knowledge
is
a
complex
one
have
said
about
its
construction
will
come
clear
from
Fanon.
Stereotyping
is
not
the
a
false
becomes
the
practices.
It
is
a
much
more
of
projection
LOCATION
CULTURE
scenario
fantasy
which,
the
ambivalence
articulates
the
the
Negro
which
the
Negro
dis­
rupts.
For
the
stereotype
once
a
substitute
shadow.
to
the
wildest
fantasies
(in
the
colonizer,
the
stereotyped
-a
one
hand,
it
pro-
a
teleology
-
conditions
domination
the
native
reformable.
other,
however,
it
effectively
displays
the
'separation',
makes
it
more
visible.
visibility
separation
which,
in
denying
the
colonized
the
capacit­
ies
independence,
Western
modes
lends
authority
to
the
official
version
power.
Racist
stereotypical
discourse,
in
its
colonial
moment,
inscribes
a
form
by
a
productive
splitting
in
its
constitution
Some
practices
recognize
the
difference
culture
as
elaborated
by
stereotypical
knowledges,
racial
theories,
administrative
colonial
experi­
ence,
institutionalize
a
range
ideologies
prejudicial,
discriminatory,
vestigial,
archaic,
'mythi­
cal',
and,
crucially,
are
recognized
as
being
so.
By
native
population
in
these
terms,
discriminatory
forms
control
are
considered
appropriate.
The
colonized
population
be
cause
system,
imprisoned
in
the
circle
visible
is
the
the
'West­
organization
justification
for
the
project
-
an
impressed
Karl
Marx.
ofhierarchization
are
peculiar
visibility
then
say
form
the
'ideological'
space
functions
openly
collaborative
political
exigencies.
The
barracks
stands
by
the
church
which
stands
by
the
schoolroom;
the
cantonment
stands
the
'civil
lines'.
Such
because
the
exercise
their
pre­
eminence.:
of
its
strategies
normalization
The
last
to
Fanon:
this
behaviour
the
one
culture
in
OF
CULTURE
qualities
of
dynamism,
of
growth,
of
depth
can
nised.
As
against
this,
[in
colonial
cultures]
we
find
characteristics,
curiosities,
things,
never
a
structure.
ambivalence
of
colonial
discourse
reveals
the
mother
country,
she
for
the
folly
of
conferring
such
privileges
condition
of
colony
mockery;
she
colony
for
a
single
could
'Reflections
African
affairs
Colonial
Office',
discourse
of
often
speaks
tongue
that
not
name
it
repeatedly
mission,
'human
and
not
wholly
uman'
famous
words
of
Lord
Rosebery,
'writ
Divine'
produces
a
text
rich
traditions
of
conflictual
economy
of
colonial
discourse
which
Edward
OF
as
the
tension
-
change,
difference
-
mimicry
represen
may
Weber's
formu-
lation
of
·
castration,
.
to
say,
that
the
discourse
authority
of
that
mode
of
colonial
discourse
that
I
have
called
mimicry
is
therefore
stricken
.
wl!ich
poses
threat
'normalized'
knowledges
and
disciplinary
powers.
effect
of
mimicry
authority
of
colonial
discourse
is
For
the
colonial
state
the
dream
of
post-Enlightenment
civility
alienates
its
of
liberty
another
knowledge
of
its
norms.
The
ambivalence
informs
is
discernible,
for
example,
Second
Treatise
which
reveal
the
limitations
of
liberty
in
his
double
use
of
the
word
'slave':
first
simply,
descriptively
as
the
locus
of
a
legitimate
form
of
ownership,
then
as
the
trope
for
illegitimate
exercise
of
power.
What
is
articulated
in
that
distance
Carolina
and
the
Original
Nature.
from
this
area
·
·
mimi
fixes
the
colonial
as
a
ean
both
'inco
e
success
of
colonial
appropriation
depends
prolifer-
that
ensure
its
strategic
failure,
so
that
mimicry
is
resemblance
and
classic
text
of
such
partiality
is
Charles
Grant's
'Observations
state
of
AND
MAN
superseded
Mills's
the
most
collude
with
divisive
caste
practices
to
prevent
dangerous
political
alliances.
Inadvertently,
Grant
produces
a
knowledge
of
Christianity
as
a
form
of
social
conflicts
with
the
that
authorize
his
discourse.
finally,
that
'partial
reform'
will
produce
form
of
English
manners
'mOcl(5JUSmorru
-a
persons
Indian
in
blood
and
colour,
in
in
morals
intellect'
-
other
words
a
mimic
'through
our
a
missionary
Wrote
a
corps
of
translators
employed
in
different
departments
of
Labour'.
line
of
descent
of
the
mimic
man
can
through
the
works
of
Kipling,
Forster,
Orwell,
Naipaul,
and
to
his
emergence,
most
recently,
in
Benedict
Anderson's
excellent
work
as
the
anomalous
Bipin
Chandra
is
the
effect
of
a
flawed
colonial
mimesis,
to
be
Anglicized
is
to
The
figure
of
mimicry
is
locatable
within
'the
inner
compatibility
the
signs
of
racial
so
that
the
'national'
is
no
longer
naturalizable.
mode
of
representation,
that
marginalizes
the
monumentality
of
OF
that
perspective
emerges
Decoud's
displaced
the
endlessness
strife
where
folly
seemed
even
bear
ignominy
lawlessness
populace
colours
barbarism,
irremediable
tyranny
is
ungovernable.
Singh's
apostasy
writing
I
have
called
mimicry
is
familiar
exercise
relations
through
narcissistic
identification
so
as
Fanon
has
observed,
black
being
person
for
white
':!Present
the
ambivalence
discourse
also
disrupts
its
author-
representation/recognition
colonial
object.
Grant's
colonial
as
partial
imitator,
Macaulay's
translator,
Naipaul's
colonial
politician
as
Decoud
as
the
scene
the
these
are
the
appropriate
objects
of
a
colonialist
chain
authorized
versions
of
otherness.
But
they
are
also,
as
I
have
shown,
the
figures
doubling,
of
a
through
the
i:S''llie'liasis
articulates
those
disturbances
racial
difference
that
menace
the
narcissistic
authority.
It
is
a
desire
colonial
appropriation
a
partial
vision
presence;
a
gaze
MIMICRY
MAN
otherness,
that
shares
the
acuity
of
the
genealogical
gaze
which,
as
Foucault
describes
it,
liberates
the
unity
of
man's
through
which
he
extends
his
sovereigrtty.
want
to
this
process
the
look
of
surveillance
textuality,
that
form
of
difference
that
is
mimicry
-
become
clear.
Writing
of
the
partial
nature
of
fantasy,
caught
visibility
of
mimicry
is
always
site
of
is
a
form
of
colonial
discourse
that
is
uttered
discourse
crossroads
of
what
is
known
and
permissible
which
though
known
must
be
kept
concealed;
a
discourse
uttered
authority.
The
'desire'
of
mimicry,
The desire
LOCATION
CULTURE
identity
the
representation
along
the
axis
not
a
harmonization
6(({efencis
comes
pro­
discriminatory
'identity
effects'
play
most
terrifying
thing
to
behold,
as
testifies
the
tortured,
negrophobic
passage,
that
shifts
anxiously
colonial
discourse..
Mimicry
goes
beyond
the
subject's
lack
(castration)
historical
crisis
conceptuality
as
the
subject
of
racial,
cultural,
culture
colonial
status',
Fanon
suggests,'[is]
both
present
against
its
members.
It
defines
them
The
ambivalence
quite
-
suggests
Long can
belief
that
alienate
the
assumptions
soon
the
disturbance
discourse
that
violates
the
rational,
enlightened
claims
enunciatory
modality.
The
ambivalence
authority
repeatedly
turns
from
difference
nothing
quite
-
difference
total
And
other
scene
power,
where
history
to
'a
part'
can
the
twin
figures
furiously,
uncontrollably.
OF
CULTURE
the
world
of
the
on
the
margins
of
the
colonial
discourse
-
the
part-objects
of
presence.
It
is
then
that
the
body
and
the
book
lose
their
part-objects
of
presence.
then
that
the
body
and
the
book
lose
their
representational
authority.
Black
skin
splits
under
the
racist
gaze,
displaced
into
oot'fil'llestandard
the
cross
standard
of
empire
finds
itself
strangely
dismembered.
In
May
missionary
wrote
from
Bengal:
Still
everyone
would
gladly
receive
a
Bible.
And
why?
-
that
he
may
lay
it
a
curiosity
for
a
few
pice;
or
use
it
for
waste
paper.
Such
it
is
well
known
has
been
the
common
fate
of
these
copies
of
the
Bible
have
been
bartered
in
the
[the
paranoid],
too,
cannot
regard
anything
in
other
people
as
indiffer­
ent,
too,
take
indications
with
which
these
other,
present
them,
them
in
their
'delusions
of
refer­
ence'.
The
meaning
of
their
delusions
of
reference
they
expect
from
all
strangers
the
sign
of
colonial
government
lower
irredeemable
act
of
divided
his
life
OF
the tax
learned
or
written
but,
says,
articulated
with
a
direct
power"
which
spreads
from
the
words
spoken
to
the
things
signified
and
forces
the
take
them
them
conform
to
the
formula',"
read
Mill's
Hobbesian
assent
to
Law,
spirited
sound
discussion,
that
'steady
communal
habit
his
it
with
those
grasps
Mill
the
boundaries
national
culture
are
long
voices
remain
individual
culture
dissension,
can
fail
to
hear
him
nationalist
ideology
Anderson
describes
contemporaneous
cultural
cohesion
connecting
its
national
subjects
through
the
undifferentiated
simultan­
eity
imaginary.
And
once
this
nationalist,
authoritarian
tone
to
see
Mill
echoes
Cicero's
forensic
principle
themselves
into
the
mental
position
who
think
differently
from
to
use
it
ambivalently;
both
principle
that
preserves
the
liberty
Western
individualist
'public
sphere'
strategy
for
polic­
ing
the
culturally
differentiated
colonial
space:
'Where
you
have
advantage
given
government
emphasis]
partialities,
prepossessions
Mill
continues
testimony
before
the
Lords,
a
perfect
substitute
for
this,
still
some
substitute
[such
dation]
To
know
that
the
embryonic
ideas
essays
and
'Representative
Government'
were
originally
formulated
draft
dis-
on
Indian
education,
written
to
Macaulay's
infamous
'Minute'
realize
-
intertextual
irony
-
both
the
limitations
problems
a
mode
discourse
a
colonial
substitute
for
democratic
'public
discussion'.
Such
a
process
Mill's
system
events
experienced
and
inscribed
are
to
into
the
acts
discourse
a
be
recognized
from
the
place
where
their
orders
were
to
into
effect',
writes
Macaulay
essay
on
Warren
Hastings,
the
Directors
East
India
perceived
the
gross
inconsistency
they
were
guilty.
examines
their
CULTURE
utterance
reinscribes,
across
differential
For
it
reveals
an
agonistic
uncertainty
contained
incompatibility
it
trial
the
very
within
which
representative
its
liberty
its
or
'intermediate
bodies'
strategies
lance
maintain
their
civil
authority
once
the
colonial
sup­
plementarity,
or
excess
address
Recordation
discursive
practice
board
or
a
colonial
civil
service.
This
produces
a
strange
irony
For
primary
impulse
not
from
the
democratic
represen­
tatives
the
members
it,
a
system
calculated
to
form
its
agents
then,
the
Mill's
proposal
implicitly
erases
all
nature'
within
Western
civility.
It
separates
the
customary
association
territory
with
a
people;
not
least,
The
only
choice
the
case
admits
choice
are,
as
we
seen,
conditions
CIVILITY
CULTURE
the
eighteenth
and
native subjects.
authorize
the
self,
recognize
its
priority,
fulfil
its
outlines,
missionary
'want?
you
give
I
take.
then
want?
have
already
enough
know
God?
know
When
you
into
a
mortar
and
stamp
it
with
a
pestle,
the
rice
CIVILITY
comparisons
Heathen
are
often
incomprehensible
to
a
European]
tell
me
do
you
like
to
see
him?
shape
Almighty,
the
Omniscient,
the
Omnipresent,
the
Righteous,
the
Truth,
the
Wisdom
Love.
shall
show
him
to
you:
you
must
learn
all
that
I
have
learned
-
then
you
will
see
God.
from
a
sermon
by
Archdeacon
urge
them
with
their
gross
misconceptions
nature
will
or
the
monstrous
follies
fabulous
theology,
they
will
turn
it
a
or
with
a
popular
and
careless
proverb.
wide
place,
a
thousand
gates';
and
religion
by
which
they
hope
to
enter.
Thus,
colonizer's
narrative
demand,
we
hear
the
echoes
sabre-rattling
strangers,
with
whom
I
began
this
chapter.
The
natives'
resistance
represents
a
frustration
teenth-eentury
strategy
the
seeks
to
dominate
the
'calculable'
individual
by
positing
the
truth
subject
not
incalculable
native
produces
a
problem
for
civil
representation
discourses
This
uncertainty
impressed
itself
on
Nathanael
Halhed
whose
Laws
the
canonical
colonialist
codification
'native'
law,
was
only
able
to
read
this
resistance
to
calculation
as
native
'folly'
or
'temporary
frenzy
the
native,
off'.23.
The
colonialist
its
echo
be
the
a
desire
for
face
process
it
problematic
to
fix
the
native
objects
the
The
native
refusal
to
unify
the
authoritarian,
colonialist
the
subject
father
This
less
traces
the
times
native
to
master,
can
effects
or
the
con­
fessional
the
native
is
partially
aligned
or
reformed
in
discourse,
the
fixed
to
circulate
or
reconjugate,
native
as
as
vigour
government
should
relaxed,
lose
its
essential
unity
·
again
like
a
flood."
Delusions
as
Judge
Schreber
confessed
to
Freud
-
are
the
common
tropes
should
reread
Fitzjames
Stephen's
famous
apocalyptic
formu­
lation
quoted
above.
oscillation
heathen,
barbarian,
chaos,
violence.
symbols
are
always
the
same,
their
ambivalent
Vedas
religiously
TAKEN
English) always
I
with
a
capital
men,
seated
trees,
and.
employed,
as
related
to
him,
to
an
elderly
looking
man,
him,
following
conversation
are
all
these
people?
come
they?'
'We
are
read
this
book.'
-
that
book?'
'The
book
-
TAKEN
on
opening
the
book,
perceived
be
the
Gospel
translated
into
the
Hindoostanee
Tongue,
many
copies
seemed
to
be
possession
party:
some
were
WRITTEN
printed
ones.
Anund
pointed
name
and
asked,
'Who
'That
book.'
-
'Where
did
you
obtain
it?'
'An
Angel
gave
at
'Yes,
to
God's
Angel:
a
man,
a
learned
Missionary.) 'The
can
the
European
Book,
when
we
believe
that
gift
to
Hurdwar.'
'God
gave
ago
Sahibs,
and
THEY
sent
ignorance
and
simplicity
are
very
striking,
never
having
heard
printed
book
before;
and
its
very
appearance
was
to
them
miraculous.
A
great
stir
was
excited
gradual
increasing
information
hereby
obtained,
and
all
united
ledge
the
superiority
doctrines
Holy
Book
thing
which
they
had
hitherto
heard
or
known.
An
indifference
to
the
distinctions
soonmanifested
itself;
and
the
interference
and
tyrannical
authority
Brahmins
became
more
offensive
and
contemptible.
At
last,
name
Father,
and
Son,
and
Holy
Ghost.
Come
to
Meerut:
there
Christian
and
shew
you
what
you
ought
to
do.'
They
answered,
must
go
home
to
the
harvest;
but,
mean
to
OF
the
nature
Sacrament
they
replied,
'We
are
willing
to
never
take
the
Sacrament.
To
all
the
other
customs
willing
to
conform,
Sacrament,
because
the
Europeans
eat
cow's
flesh,
and
this
will
never
us.'
To
this
I
answered,
'This
and
not
your
hearts
to
understand,
then
you
will
it.'
They
replied,
'If
all
receive this
receive this
replied,
a
hundred
years
later,
oseph
Conrad's
Marlow,
trav­
elling
Congo,
night
first
ages,
without
a
sign
and
cut
the
comprehension
surroundings,
desperately
in
need
deliberate
belief,
comes
upon
Towson's
(or
Towser's)
a
very
enthralling
book;
the
first
glance
you
could
see
there
a
singleness
an
honest
concern
for
the
right
way
which
made
these
humble
pages,
thought
out
so
many
years
ago,
luminous
with
another
than
a
professional
light.
assure
you
was
like
tearing
myself
away
from
the
shelter
old
and
solid
friendship
this
miserable
trader
-
this
intruder,'
exclaimed
the
manager,
looking
back
malevolently
at
the
place
left.
'He
must
be
English,'
I
said.'
Half
a
century
later,
a
young
Trinidadian
discovers
that
same
volume
very
passage
from
Conrad
and
draws
from
it
a
vision
and
a
lesson
'The
scene',
writes
answered
some
political
panic
I
was
beginning
To
be
a
colonial
was
to
know
a
kind
it
was
to
inhabit
a
fixed
world.
And
I
suppose
that
I
had
seen
myself
coming
to
England
some
purely
literary
region,
where,
untrammeled
by
the
accidents
or
background,
I
could
make
a
romantic
career
for
myself
writer.
But
new
world
I
felt
that
ground
move
below
everywhere
before
me.
Not
man
with
a
cause,
man
offering
vision
world's
half-made
TAKEN
WONDERS
are
name
father
and
the
author,
these
texts
civilizing
mission
immediately
suggest
the
triumph
colonialist
moment
English
Evangelism
and
literature.
The
discovery
book
installs
the
sign
representation:
the
word
truth,
art
creates
the
conditions
for
a
beginning,
a
practice
and
narrative.
But
the
institution
Word
wilds
an
process
distortion,
dislocation,
firmly
and
timely
spoken
For
it
represents
a
shift
away
from
the
'Orientalist'
educational
practice
of,
say,
Warren
Hastings
and
the
much
more
interventionist
ambition
Grant
for
a
culturally
and
linguistically
homo­
geneous
English
India.
It
was
with
Grant's
election
to
the
board
India
Company
and
through
his
TAKEN
FOR
permits
Conrad
to
entertain
the
ideological
ambivalences
that
riddle
his
narratives.
its
watchful
that
the
fraught
text
oflate
from
Africa
to
the
Caribbean
to
transform
the
despair
history
into
an
appeal
for
the
autonomy
The
more
fiercely
that
'the
wisdom
heart
ha[s]
with
the
erection
or
demolition
the
more
convinced
nature
book
-
'the
words
have
the
value
The
values
that
such
a
perspective
generates
for
his
and
for
the
once
colonized
world
it
chooses
to
represent
and
evaluate,
are
visible
hideous
panorama
that
some
titles
provide:
discovery
English
book
establishes
both
a
measure
and
a
mode
authority
and
order.
scenes,
as
I
have
narrated
them,
suggest
the
triumph
writ
power,
then
that
the
wily
as
a
articulation
two
disproportionate
sites.
discourse
the
colonial
scene
invention
mimesis
or
as
the
defence,
display
produces
a
than
antagonistic).
Its
discriminatory
effects
are
vis­
ible
split
subjects
racist
stereotype
-
the
simian
Negro,
the
effeminate
Asiatic
male
-
which
ambivalently
fix
identity
as
the
colonial
presence
realize
colonial
text
occupies
inscrip­
tion,
hallowed
-
no,
hollowed
-
Derrida:
writing
both
marks
back
over
its
mark
with
an
undecidable
stroke
double
the
pertinence
or
authority
it
does
not
overturn
it
inscribes
it
within
its
functions
or
parts.
This
displacement
does
place,
has
not
taken
place
once
as
an
a
simple
place.
It
does
place
(is
what)
can
the
question
the
English,
be
posed
interstices
double
inscription?
I
have
no
wish
to
replace
an
idealist
the
use
transparency.
a
certain
the
Bible
translated
into
Hindi,
propagated
by
Dutch
the
English
book;
a
Polish
influenced
by
Gustave
Flaubert,
writing
produces
an
What
a
process
fails
to
be
an
authoritative
acknowledgement
to
be
a
'spacing
a
WONDERS
or
or
as
the
problematic
relation
OF
which
occupies
a
position
lying
on
the
border­
FOR
marginalization
and
so
forth.
For
colonial
domination
through
a
process
the
chaos
intervention
as
dislocatory
presence
to
preserve
the
authority
identity
teleological
narratives
evolutionism.
The
exercise
authority,
however,
requires
the
production
individuations,
identity
effects
through
which
dis­
criminatory
practices
can
map
populations
tarred
with
the
visible
Such
a
mode
tion
from
describes
trans­
parency':
the
reign
after
the
late
eighteenth
century,
which
could
areas
to
exercise
the
mere
fact
being
known
seen
immediate,
collective
gaze.
radically
differentiates
the
exercise
unsuitability
enlightenment
assumption
eye
Jeremy
Bentham
(as
Michel
Perrot
points
out),
the
small
group
whole
authority
requires
modes
(cultural,
racial,
administrative
a
stable
unitary
assumption
The
the
col­
onialist
foreign
body)
'whole'
(conquered
country),
right
on
its
radical
difference.
Such
-a
discriminatory
identities.
(For
a
related
argument
see
the
description
pedagogical
and
the
performative
8.)
To
demonstrate
such
an
'excess'
to
celebrate
the
joyous
power
sign
productivity
power,
forces
and
fixities;
it
name
for
the
strategic
reversal
process
through
disavowal
(that
is,
the
production
identities
that
secure
the
'pure'
identity
Hybridity
revaluation
assumption
identity
through
the
effect
power
to
be
the
ation
rather
than
the
noisy
command
authority
or
the
silent
repression
traditions,
then
an
important
change
occurs.
The
ambivalence
at
the
source
discourses
on
authority
enables
a
form
founded
on
the
undecidability
that
turns
the
discursive
conditions
into
the
grounds
academic
wisdom
that
the
presence
established
through
the
non-exercise
judgement
exclusion
with
the
authoritative
reason.
The
recognition
however,
requires
a
validation
source
that
immediately,
even
intuitively,
that
countenance
which
I
would
fain
call
master'
-
and
held
(rules
What
unacknowledged
paradox
a
demand
for
resulting
ambivalence
for
positions
Lukes
rightly
says,
the
acceptance
excludes
an
evaluation
content
utterance,
and
source,
which
disavows
both
conflicting
reasons
and
personal
judgement,
then
can
the
'signs'
or
'marks'
more
than
'empty'
presences
they
the
less
effective
because
effective
different
form,
would
Tom
Nairn
reveals
a
basic
ambivalence
gloomy
cosmic
truth
Marabar
caves'."
Nairn
explains
this
'imperial
.delirium'
disproportion
OF
CULTURE
two
scenes
book,
dialectical
play
The
displacement
from
symbol
to
sign
creates
a
crisis
for
any
concept
based
on
a
system
colonial
specularity,
doubly
inscribed,
does
not
produce
a
mirror
where
apprehends
itself;
the
split
screen
self
and
its
doubling,
the
hybrid.
These
which
can
then
be
resolved
issue
relativism.
Hybridity
problematic
representation
and
individuation
that
reverses
the
effects
colonialist
disavowal,
so
that
other
'denied'
knowledges
enter
upon
the
dominant
discourse
and
estrange
the
basis
-
Again,
stressed,
simply
the
know
ledges
-
be
they
forms
otherness
or
traditions
treachery
-
that
articulation
and
dislocation,
possible
to
identify
'the
cultural'
disposal
a
negative
transparency
that-comes
to
be
agonistically
constructed
around
the
ambivalence
denial,
-
practices
-
the.
production
and
Hybridity
intervenes
exercise
not
merely
to
indicate
the
impossibility
represent
the
unpre­
dictability
presence.,
The
book
WONDERS
device
specific
colonial
engagement,
an
appurtenance
This
partializing
process
ofhybridity
described
as
it
fulfils
the
universalist
concepts
particular,
post­
Enlightenment
ideological
practices.
Consider,
for
example:
Locke's
notion
wasteland
-
beginning
all
the
World
emblem
wasteful
life
voice
from
these
native,
chains
command,
achieves
a
TAKEN
technology
then disavows
deploy
'natives'
to
destroy
native
culture
This
repeated
production
teleological
narrative
cal
witness:
bereft
Brahmins,
gather­
ings.
The
descent
from
God
to
the
English
linear
'This
to
understand,
then
you
will
it.'
The
historical
'evidence'
for
all
to
see,
Evangel­
ists
argued,
with
the
help
the
missionary
OF
CULTURE
miraculous
equivalence
and
the
English.
They
introduce
the
practice
cultural
differentiation
indispensable
discourse
of
function
Foucault
describes
to
a
'referential'
that
the
place,
the
condition,
the
field
the
'look
like
the
work
decision
to
produce
simple,
abridged
tracts
plainest
narrative
that
may
inculcate
the
habit
solitary
reading',
missionary
wrote
so
that
the
natives
may
resist
the
Brahmin's
'monopoly
and
lessen
their
dependence
on
their
own
religious
and
cultural
traditions;
it
opinion
Reverend
Donald
English
they
acquire
ideas
quite
new,
and
first
importance,
respecting
God
and
his
government'
1816,
1816,
pp.
444-5;
March
1816,
pp.
1
shrewd
view
unknown
native,
in
1819:
For
instance,
I
take
a
book
and
read
it
awhile
and
natives'
stipulation
that
only
mass
conversion
would
persuade
them
to
take
the
sacrament
touches
on
a
tension
changing
its
terms
while
maintaining
their
visibility;
they
introduce
a
lack
that
represented
doubling
This
mode
disturbance
sharp
practice,
rather
like
that
perfidious
barbers
bazaars
who
customers
with
the
money
or
your
life',
leaving
them
with
nothing.
No,
these
wily
oriental
thieves,
with
far
greater
skill,
cHents'
the copula,
on
the
other,
It
fades.
the
point
that
the
OF
CULTURE
it
syntagmatically
with
a
range
know
ledges
estrange
its
'identity'
case
discourse,
these
syntagmatic
appropriations
confront
contradictory
differ­
ences
enunciative
function
disavowed.
explanation
to
acknowledge
the
agency
Evangelicals:
from
heaven
gave
Bible]
us,
at
may
be
the
called
an
The
effect
TAKEN
strictly
technical
sense.
question
like
the
technique
practised
Read
as
a
tale
emerges
as
a
authority,
an
agonistic
space.
To
the
form
warfare,
mimicry
disobedience
discipline
signs
resistance.
Then
the
the
site
-
the
warlike,
native
-
read
to
the
Reverend
Sperch­
1818,
was
a
more
worried:
If
you
urge
or
the
fabulous
theology,
they
will
sly
civility
perhaps,
or
proverb.
Was
spirit
sly
civility
native
Christians
long
at
the
mention
politely
excused
themselves:
the
to
Meerut.'
significance
Bible?
Who
knows?
the Bible
receive
a
Bible.
may
store
it
a
curiosity;
sell
it
for
a
few
pice;
or
use
waste
paper
have
been
bartered
remarks
are
at
all
an
indiscriminate
distri­
bution
scriptures,
to
everyone
say
he
wants
a
Bible,
can
be
little
less
than
a
waste
a
waste
waste
For
while
the
public
are
hearing
distributed,
they
expect
to
hear
soon
corres­
(MR,
May
1817,
difference
nonsense
can
the
mind
take
hold
a
country?
Generations
have
tried,
remain
The
important
towns
they
build
are
only
find
their
way
home.
India
knows
calls
'Come'
through
her
hundred
mouths,
through
objects
ridiculous
and
august.
what?
She
has
never
defined.
She
a
promise,
only
an
appeal.
Fact
that
I
have
said
that
the
effect
same
time,
from
those
earth,
there
comes
another,
more
ominous
silence
an
archaic
colonial
'otherness',
obliterating
a
triumphalism.into
complex
the
whose
craft
takes
him
no
further
afield
seeks
Kurtz's
Voice,
his
words,
'a
stream
or
the
deceitful
flow
from
the
OF
CULTURE
other,
the
sign
found
the
mission
that
recognition
for
the
colonial
subject
-
as
a
distinctive
feature
of
the
imperialist
from
this
transference
of
affect
is
never
achieved
without
a
disturb­
ance,
a
displacement
in
the
representation
of
empire's
Mar­
low's
compulsive
search
for
those
famous
is
just
a
name,
'terrific
the
wl'iiCl\1Fie
cOiomal
is
deathcall
-
the
horror
of
these
are
descriptions
of
colonial
'otherness',
colonial
silence
that
mocks
the
social
performance
to
hybrid
signifiers
are
the
intimations
of
colonial
otherness
that
Forster
describes
so
well
beckoning
of
India
to
the
conquerors:
'She
calls
. . .
THE ARCHAIC
the
surface
of
Nostromo
strewn
with
the
lation
of
a
unitary
or
of
culture's
representation
of
difference­
of
a
the
-
ouboum
-
kernel
of
non-sense.
What
becomes
of
cultural
identity,
the
ability
to
right
word
in
the
right
place
right
time,
when
it
crosses
the
colonial
non-sense?
question
impedes
the
language
of
relativism
in
which
cultural
difference
is
usually
disposed
of
as
a
kind
of
in
his
interesting
work
that
warns,
projection.
project
of
·
·
1 b
preose
e _
a
it
is
the
compensation
of
that
loss
in
projection
or
introjection
which
then
becomes
the
its
parenthesis,
a
question
not
dissimilar
to
Forster's
India
question
or
Lacan's
question
of
the
subject;
'What
is
this
talk
of
projection
[in
the
midst
of
naturalism]
really
saying?
What
is
the
screen?'
He
makes
no
answer.
The
problematic
enunciation
of
cultural
difference
becomes,
in
the
OF
CULTURE
the
perspectival
problem
of
temporal
and
spatial
distance.
The
threatened
'loss'
inter­
she
says
then
the
echo
performance
text,
I
have
attempted
to
articulate
the
enunciatory
disorder
colonial
present,
the
writing
staging
signifier
narrative
uncertainty
knowledge
'that':
the
priority
relation
language,
the
values
and
alterity
that
colonial
non-sense.
CULTURE
writes:
Assume
the
regularity
the
systematic
nature
world,
not
because
it
which
eludes
such
a
principle
also
eludes
real
knowledge;
knowledge
be
possible
at
all,
then
the
principle
to
it.
confusion
into
the
sublime
culture-concept,
cultural
generalizability
to
the
extent
to
which
differentiation
the
genesis
recalled
performance
What
I
have
suggested
above,
for
the
colonial
cultural
signifier,
the
radical
loss
a
homologous
dialectical
assemblage
enunciatory
ambivalence
culture
cannot,
be
derived
directly
from
the
'temporal
pulsation'
signifier;
the
rule
be
allegorized
misrule
There
is,
however,
a
mode
through
the
annals
paradox
fully
exposed
essay
on
'The
foundations
government
opposition
to
the
!bert
Bill-
an
opportunity
which
he
uses
to
attack
the
utilitarian
governance
A
barrel
be
harmless
or
may
explode,
cannot
educate
it
into
household
fuel
by
exploding
little
bits
you
possibly
teach
great
masses
be
rather
dissatisfied
with
a
foreign
ruler,
much;
should
express
their
discontent
should
ask
from
him
this
(which
they
neither
care
for),
on
no
account
rise
against
him.
statements
be
dismissed
OF
CULTURE
to
me.
And
not
to
me
alone.
For
take
to
be
that
split-second,
that
ambivalent
temporality
that
demonstrates
the
turn
from
evolutionism
-to
diffusionism
culturalist
discourse
governmentality;,
an
ambiguity
that
articulated
the
otherwise
opposed
policies
utilitarians
and
comparativists
mid­
essay
on
the
'Observation
India
figure
intellectual
uncer­
tainty
ambivalence.
If
India
reproduction
common
Aryan
origin,
discourse
it
a
imminent
object
sign
dispersal
in
the
exercise
that
will
eventually
either
be
sublated
or
will
endlessly
circulate
dereliction
identificatory
Such
enunciations
colonial
difference
are-closer
to
has
sis
relations
the
over-familiar
that
constantly
eludes
one',
he
writes,
like
'those
famous
transparencies
which,
although
they
conceal
nothing
density,
are
nevertheless
not
entirely
clear.
The
enunciative
level
emerges
very
proximity.'26
If
at
first
sight
the
statements
Maine
and
Fitzjames
Stephen
are
the
uncommon
commonplaces
or
imperial
history,
then,
doubly
inscribed,
their
difference
emerges
quite
clearly
culture-concept
itself.
'The
symbols
social
-
the
police,
the
bugle
calls
in
the
barracks,
military
waving
at
one
same
time
inhibitory
to
It
an
enunciatory
space,
where
the
act
in
articulating
a
split-response
-
in
two
longitudes'
-
texts
nonsense
aporia
have
to
negotiate
their
discursive
authority.
Ambivalence,
at
the
describes
as
the
vicissitude
idea,
as
distinct
from
the
vicissitude
repression
to
often
noted
-
process
even
as
it
negates
the
visibility
produces
a
strategy
for
the
negotiation
knowl­
edges
These
knowledges
make
sense
for
the
absence
It
such
a
vicissi­
idea
in
its
colonial
enunciation,
culture
articulated
at
the
erasure,
a
non-sense
disciplinary
meanings
itself.
A
colonial
non-sense,
however,
ductive
strategies
authority
There
occurs,
then,
as
the
'normalizing'
strat­
egy
splitting,
a
certain
anomalous
containment
ambivalence.
in
Fitzjames
Stephen's
attack
on
the
undecid­
ability
colonial
governance.
What
structures
his
statement
threatening
production
the
discursive
subject
the
enlightened
liberal
subject
itself.
But
the
the
reversion
to
chaos,
to
maintain
the
vigilance
towards
Throne
and
Altar.to
reinforce
the
belligerence
civilization,
which
authoritative,
Fitzjames
Stephen
writes;
shirk
from
the
open,
uncompromis­
ing,
straightforward
assertion
anomaly
British
government
This
insoluble
anomaly
preoccupied
throughout
the
people
by
another
does
not
and
cannot
open
assertion
anomalous
produces
an
impossible
cultural
choice:
civilization
or
the
threat
-
either
one
or
the
other
-
whereas
the
discursive
choice
continually
both
practice
anomalously
the
'intellectual
uncertainty',
not
simply
a
doubt
content
doubt,
or
an
uncertainty
native
place
at
the
point
colonizer's
demand
for
narrative,
at
the
moment
master's
interrogation.
This
asked
appeal
indisputable
geographical
fact
that
Arctic
and
Antarctic
regions,
the
period
from
sun­
rise
to
OF
usually
cuts
the
Gordian
Knot
by
boldly
denying
the
geographical
fact
many,
the
glosses
subterfuges
to
which
he
feels
himself
impelled
to
resort."
The
Brahmans
treat
with
equal
contempt,
not
only
the
demonstrations
testimony
eyes'.
The
systematic
mistranslation,
drawing
from
the
was
the
identity
two
'subtile
system'.
The
strategy
production
space
belief,
even
more
sly
and
subtle,
describe,
where
to
say
lying'
to
tell
the
vice,
versa.
Who,
in
truth,
in
the
verisimilitude
translation,
which
a
mistranslation?
warfare
discourse
lurks
the
fear
speaking
in
two
tongues,
language
itself
becomes
doubly
inscribed
and
the
intellec­
tual
system
uncertain.
The
colonizer's
interrogation
becomes
anomalous,
'for
every
the
Christian
missionary
can
employ
to
communi­
cate
divine
appropriated
as
the
chosen
symbol
already appropri­
significance,
the
authority
address.
When
the
Mohammedan
deny
the
logical
demonstration
cal
fact
and
the
Hindu
turns
away
from
the
evidence
eyes,
we
witness
a
a
mode
'a
coercion
subject
can
exist.
simply
a
question
absence
or
morality:
through
such
historical
and
philosophical
distinctions
differences,
to
rest
precariously
empty
discursive
space
where
the
question
human
capacity
lies.
To
a
little
grandly,
the
problem
now
question
itself
as
to
and
contested
in
the
colonial
imitation-
not
As
before,
the
question
occurs
archaic
undecidability.
eve
mid-1820s,
the
Reverend
through
the
quarter
where
the
image-makers
are
at
work.
A
million
images
goddess
Durga
affront
his
eyes;
a
million
hammers
beating
brass
and
tin
assault
his
ears;
a
million
dismembered
Durgas,
eyes,
arms,
heads,
some
unpainted,
others
unformed,
assail
him
to
reverie:
The
recollections
past
strangely
blend
with
the
visible
exhi­
bitions
present.
The
old
their
form
and
you
cannot
they
are
men
increased;
grounds
decision
have
multiplied
too."
argument
interrogates,
from
the
colonial
perspective,
this
cultural
compulsion
to
'be,
become,
or
be
seen,
to
be
problem
caught
vacillatory
syntax
entire
passage;
heard
finally
'cannot'
doubt
that
they
are
men.'
I
will
suggest
that
the
coercive
image
colonized
subject
produces.a
loss
or
lack
that
articulates
an
uncanny
truth
cul­
tural
authority
and
its
figurative
space
The
infinite
also
the
imperialism.
them
to
the
.law
both
necessary
and
imposs­
ible
transparency,
impossible
univocity.
Translation
becomes
law,
debt,
debt
one
can
no
longer
discharge."
performance
the
lack
that,
in
translation,
impedes
the
dialectical
process
generality
and
communic­
ability.
where
there
threat
explicate
this
strategy
splitting:
with
for
contraries,
I
suggest
that
we
read
the
fable
Double
uncannily,
the essay
to
be
distinctive,
significatory,
influential
it
has
to
be
translated,
disseminated,
differentiated,
interdisciplinary,
intertextual,
international,
inter-racial.
137
OF
the
uncanny
double
of
the
verisimilitude
-
the
establishment
of
the
Law.
Folly
is
a
form
of
perjury
for
which
Halhed
assures
us,
in
his
preface
to
the
form
of
words
exists.
however,
that
its
structure
repeats
that
enunciatory
splitting
that
I
have
been
attempt­
ing
to
describe.
Halhed
writes,
in
falsehoods
totally
incompatible
with
each
other
contrary
to
their
knowledge
is
like
the
madness
so
inimitably
delineated
in
Cervantes,
sensible
enough
occasions
same
time
explanations
for
perjury,
the
myth
of
the
lie
persists
pages
of
power,
even
reports
1920s.
What
is
the
truth
of
the
lie?
When
the
Muslim
is
coerced
into
speaking
a
Christian
truth
he
denies
the
logic
of
his
senses;
the
the
evidence
of
his
eyes;
the
Bengalee
denies
his
very
name
as
himself.
told.
Each
time
to
as
the
truth
of
the
native
culture
is
a
becomes
ambivalently
incorporated
in
the
archives
of
colonial
knowledge.
A
the
geographical
its
that
its
integrity
without
destroying
its
are
mind
of
a
child,'
the
psychoanalyst
Karl
Abraham
writes,
a
fly
pulled
off
a
leg,
existence
of
the
disabled
native
is
required
for
the
riext
lie
next
next
-
'The
Horror!
the
Horror!'
Marlow,
you
will
remember,
lie
as
from
the
heart
of
darkness
to
the
Belgian
boudoir.
As
the
words
of
horror
for
the
name
of
the
Intended
in
that
palimpsest,
neither
one
nor
the
other,
unwelcome
truth
of
empire's
narrative
margins
of
the
title
of
-
DissemiNation
-
owes
that
moment
of
the
scattering
of
the
people
that
in
other
times
and
other
places,
in
the
nations
of
others,
becomes
a
time
of
gathering.
Gatherings
of
exiles
gees;
gathering
edge
of
'foreign'
cultures;
gathering
fron­
tiers;
gatherings
in
the
city
centres;
gathering
in
the
half-life,
half-light
of
foreign
tongues,
uncanny
fluency
of
another's
language;
gathering
the
signs
of
approval
and
acceptance,
degrees,
discourses,
disciplines;
gathering
the
memories
of
underdevel­
opment,
of
other
worlds
lived
the
East.
The
the
OF
CULTURE
discourse
of
nationalism
is
not
my
main
concern.
ways
it
is
the
historical
certainty
and
on
the
temporal
dimension
in
the
inscription
of
these
political
entities
-
that
are
also
potent
symbolic
and
affective
sources
of
cultural
identity
-
of
the
nation
as
a
cultural
force.
equivalence
of
event
signifies
a
people,
a
nation,
or
a
national
culture
as
an
empirical
sociological
category
or
a
holistic
cultural
entity.
'However,
the
narrative
and
psychological
force
to
bear
political
effect
of
the
ambivalence
of
the
'nation'
as
a
narrative
this
displacement
and
such
well
as
historical
contin­
gency
the
textual
object
itself'
(my
emphasis).'
Fredric
Jameson
invokes
too
can
one
avoid
sense,
by
;
without
the
falls
condition
-
which
explain
labile
identifications
images
'China',
'America'.
The
entitlement
of
the
tribe
theory,
alive
to
the
to
will
to
one
write
the
nation's
modernity
as
the
event
every­
the
epochal?
The
language
of
national
belonging
comes
laden
apologues,
which
has
led
Benedict
Anderson
to
ask:
'But
celebrate
their
hoariness,
astonish­
ing
youth?'
nation's
claim
to
modernity,
as
form
of
political
rationality,
is
particularly
questionable
postcolonial
perspective:
Nationalism
to
represent
itself
image
of
the
Eng­
lightenment
to
For
Enlightenment
itself,
to
assert
its
sovereignty
as
the
universal
ideal,
needs
its
ever
actualise
itself
real
world
as
the
truly
universal,
it
destroy
itsel£.
. . .
only
disjunctive
time
nation's
modernity
-
knowledge
caught
midst
the
language
reveals
a
politics
once
provoca­
tively
wrote:
'Space
time
without
duration.??
To
write
the
story
nation
ambiv­
alence
the
begin
has
this
founding
dictum
political
description
national
on
would
be
at
a
Bakhtin,
LOCATION
CULTURE
'double-time'
cannot
be
so
simply
represented
as
visible
or
flexible
in
nor
can
we
accept
Bakhtin's
repeated
read
the
national
space
as
achieved
only
in
the
apprehension
of
the
split'
time
representation,
as
I
leads
us
to
question
the
homogeneous
and
horizontal
view
associated
nation's
imagined
community.
We
are
led
to
ask
subaltern
within
a
culture
ever
articulate
in
that
fullness
time
and
visual
synchrony
sign
that
Bakhtin
proposes.
Two
accounts
emergence
narratives
seem
to
sup.port
my
suggestion.
They
represent
the
and
slave
which,
eighteenth­
century
novel;
and
Baker's
innovative
.reading
which
was
the
language
gentleman
defined
through
a
process
-
occupation,
faculty
-
so
that
this
centred
vision
to
speak
'a
condition
one
who
able
to
comprehend
everything,
and
evidence
comprehended
different
note
in
Baker's
descnption
'radical
maroonage'
the
emergence
insurgent
Afro­
American
expressive
culture
in
its
expansive,
'national'
phase.
Baker's
sense
that
the
'discursive
project'
Harlem
Renaissance
on a
fugitives who
or
promise,
profit
and
modes
From
this
liminal,
minority
position
where,
would
say,
the
relations
are
nature
the
force
people
Afro-American
nation
emerge
extended
OF
ambivalence
tension
knowledge
rule,
he
allows
the
contradiction
to
himself.
The
ideological
discourse
are
examining
has
sequential
energy
historical
memory
re-presents
inexorable
tutes
the
exorbitant
image
it
certainty
or
closure?
What
might
be
the
cultural
effects
liminality
nation,
the
margins
which
come
to
be
signified
narrative
temporalities
ambiv­
alence
Deprived
-
'looking
to
the
legitimacy
cultural
autonomy'25
-
the
nation
turns
from
being
the
symbol
into
becoming
the
symptom
OF
a
shadow
Outside.
polarity
prefigurative
self-generating
nation
'in­
itself'
and
extrinsic
other
nations,
the
performative
introduces
a
tempor­
ality
essential
precondition
for
deploying
a
concept
such
as
Raymond
Williams's
cru­
cial
distinction
liminal
point
ideological
dis­
placement
turning
differentiated
spatial
boundary,
the
'outside',
into
the
authenticating
'inward'
time
Freud's
concept
'narcissism
differences?"
-
instance
-
to
illustrate
the
ambivalent
identification
and
hate
that
binds
a
community
as
a
ary
the
Outside.
But
I
have
argued,
the
people
are
the
articulation
doubling
national
address,
an
ambivalent
OF
CULTURE
subject is
of
the
-
into
the
area
of
the
symbolic
of
representation/signification
-
the
social
fact
'three-dimen­
sional'.
For
its
finitude
subject
of
to
address
their
strategies
of
a
honzon
of
'hegemony'
that
is
envisaged
as
horizontal
The
great
contribution
of
Foucault's
last
published
work
is
to
suggest
that
people
emerge
in
the
as
a
'What
are
we
to-day?'
poses
perti­
nent
must
be
derived
from
the
cannot
be
conceived
in
a
state
of
,
state
is
in
permanent
1
. . .
future
of
struggles.
Politics
has
now
to
deal
with
multiplicity
of
states
struggling
history
is its
is
politically
significant
is
the
effect
of
.
this
finitude
of
the
the
liminal
representation
of
the
people.
The
contained
in
.
progress;
mod­
is
an
which
finitude
the
impossibility
of
such
an
past.
The
liminality
of
the
people
-
their
only the
OF
in
the
antinomies
of
law
and
order
-
the
colonized
difficulty
of
writing
the
history
of
the
people
as
insurmountable
agonism
of
the
living,
the
incommensurable
experiences
of
struggle
construction
of
a
national
culture,
is
nowhere
start
with
a
warning
against
the
intellectual
appropriation
of
the
'culture
of
the
people'
(whatever
that
may
be)
within
a
representational­
ist
discourse
that
may
become
fixed
and
reified
annals
of
History.
·
·
that
assumes
o c
space
of
As
here
is
not
with
the
history
of
nationalist
movements,
with
certain
traditions
of
writing
that
have
attempted
to
construct
narratives
of
the
social
imaginary
of
the
nation-people,
I
to
Fanon
for
liberating
a
certain,
uncertain
time
of
the
people.
The
knowledge
of
the
people
depends
discovery,
Fanon
says,
'of
a
much
more
fundamental
substance
is
continually
being
renewed',
a
structure
of
fluctuating
movement
that
the
people
are
shape
to'.
The
present
of
the
people's
history,
then,
is
a
practice
that
destroys
the
constant
principles
of
the
national
culture
that
attempt
to
hark
back
to
a
'true'
national
past,
which
is
often
represented
in
the
reified
forms
of
realism
and
stereotype.
Such
pedagogical
knowledges
and
continuist
national
narra­
tives
miss
the
'zone
of
occult
instability
where
the
people
dwell'
(Fanon's
phrase).
culture
comes
to
be
articulated
as
a
variqus
-
modem,
colonial,
postcolonial,
cannot
he
stabilized
always
contempor­
aneous
with
the
reC:Uatioi\.IITstne
act
that
of
its
occurrences
marshalls
ephemeral
temporality
inhabiting
the
space
hear".'
critique
of
the
fixed
and
stable
forms
of
the
nationalist
narra­
makes
it
imperative
to
question
theories
of
the
horizontal,
homo-
geneous
empty
time
of
the
nation's
narrative.
Does
the
language
of
'occult
instability'
have
a
relevance
outside
the
situation
of
anti­
colonial
struggle?
incommensurable
act
of
living
-
so
often
dismissed
as
political.
acknowledged
that
that
title
has
its
conjunctur.
al,
not
simply
in
psychoanalysis
and
semiotics,
a s
ence
of
feminist
c
an
psychic
identifications.
The
nation
as
a
symbolic
the
rationalist
and
progressivist
lo
'cs
of
'canonical'
na
.
o e
of
identity
constituted
by
historical
pedagogical);
idenh;o/
cultural
identification
(the
performative).
The
time
KliSteva's
constructioi\Ofihe
finitude
is
analogous
to
my
argument
that
is
remarkable
is
her
insistence
that
the
gendered
sign
political
effects
of
Kristeva's
multiple
women's
time
leads
to
what
the
'demassification
of
difference'.
The
cultural
moment
of
'occult
instability'
signifies
the
people
in
a
fluctuating
move­
ment
giving
that
postcolonial
time
the
teleological
traditions
of
past
and
present,
and
'
historicist
archaic
and
the
modem.
These
are
not
simply
attempts
to
invert
the
balance
of
power
within
an
unchanged
order
of
discourse.
culture
or
feminist
and
postcolonial
temporalities
force
reihii\k
question
of
community
and
communication
moment
of
transcendence:
how
do
we
understand
such
forms
of
social
identification
is
then
poised
on
the
brink
of
what
Kristeva
OF
'loss
of
identity'
describes
as
a
profound
cultural
The
people
as
a
fonn
of
address
emerge
from
the
\abyss
where
the
subject
splits,
the
the
performative
are
agonistically
articulated.
collectivity
at
stake.
Neither
can
cultural
homogeneity,
nation's
horizontal
space
ively
represented
within
the
familiar
territory
of
the
causality
adequately
understood
as
a
of
a
'statist'
centre;
the
rationality
of
political
choice
be
divided
words,
as
a
'sociological
in
a
'succession
of
prisons,
remote
villages
-
where
the
social
space
is
clearly
bounded
repeated
objects
that
represent
a
naturalistic,
national
horizon.
_
the
difference
movement
of
meaning
the
people
movement
of
its
sign
inter­
rupts
the
succession
of
plurals
that
produce
the
sociological
solidity
of
the
national
narrative.
The
nation's
totality
is
confronted
with,
by,
a
supplementary
movement
of
of
Derridean
supplementarily
in
follows
the
agonistic,
ambivalent
movement
The
the
supplement
suggests,
however,
that
or
insinuates
itself
represents
and
makes
of
a
presence
supplement
a
subaltern
instance
substi­
tute,
it
simply
the
positivity
of
a
presence,
it
produces
that
the
disjunctive
times
of
Fanon
and
Kristeva
can
be
turned
the
discourses
of
emergent
cultural
identities,
within
a
non-plural­
politics
of
difference.
space
of
cultural
signification
that
opens
and
holds
of
intervention
is
similar
to
what
British
recognizes
as
a
supplementary
question.
a
question
that
is
supplementary
to
stated
'order
the
minister's
response.
the
The
supplementary
strategy
suggests
adding
not
disturb
the
calculation.
As
succinctly
suggested,
'supplements
pluses
that
compensate
for
a
minus
in
the
as
in
less-than-one
that
a
elide
her
representation
as
fragmentation
-
minority
does
not
simply
confront
the
master-discourse
with
a
contradictory
referent.
It
its
object
by
initially
withholding
its
objective.
Insinuating
into
the
terms
of
reference
of
the
dominant
discourse,
the
sup-
produce
questiorung
of
the
space
from
which
the
narrative
of
the
nation
must
power
of
supplementarity
is
not
the
negation
of
the
preconstituted
social
contradictions
of
the
past
its
force
lies
-
as
we
shall
see
discussion
of
follows
-
in
the
of
those
times,
terms
and
traditions
through
which
passing
contemporaneity
into
the
signs
of
history.
a
Black
Audio
and
Film
Collective
during
the
uprisings
of
the
Handsworth
district
of
OF
England.
the
midst
of
the
uprising,
haunted
moments:
the
arrival
of
the
migrant
population
emergence
of
a
black
British
peoples
diaspora.
And
the
is
the
emergence
of
a
black
British
cultural
politics.
The
racism
of
statistics
and
documents
is
interrupted
perplexed
living
of
Handsworth
songs.
Two
translate
the
living
perplexity
of
of
ship
fantasmatic
scenario
of
Freud's
family
where
the
the
perplexity
of
shot
of
a
dreadlocked
rastafarian
cutting
a
swathe
through
a
posse
of
policemen
during
the
uprising.
a
memory
that
flashes
incessantly
through
the
dangerous
Paul's,
In
the
ghostly
see
Enoch
X
And
from
the
gathering
walk
with
to
the
sea,
horizons
straight
ahead
Wave
the
sea
back
it
comes,
Crawling
footsteps
When
The
perplexity
of
the
living
must
understood
as
some
existen­
tial,
strange
temporality
of
the
of
the
(
no
the
gathering
points
of
political
solidarity.
They
will
not,
however,
celebrate
the
monumentality
of
historicist
memory,
the
sociological
totality
of
one
then
narrate
present
that
is
neither
punctual
time
configurations
of
cultural
difference
assume
forms
of
cultural
authority?
The
narrati
can
only
begin,
Benedict
Anderson
\
imaginary.
OF
signifier
enables
a
national
a
form
of
·This
simultaneity-along-time.
The
narrative
mits
'transverse,
cross-time,
The
a
sociological
solidity;
it
temporality,
the
its
narra­
tive
consciousness,
as
it.
of
the
imagined
community
is
constructed
from
mensurable
temporalities
its
coherence.
space
sign,
its
separation
neither
synchronous
temporality
is
of
cultural
signification,
alien­
ates
of
community.
From
the
cultural homogeneity
initially
located
the
imagined
community
of
the
nation
in
the
homogeneous
time
of
realist
narrative,
towards
the
his
work
Anderson
abandons
the
'meanwhile'
-
his
pedagogical
temporality
of
the
people.
to
represent
the
people
as
a
performative
discourse
of
public
identification,
a
process
he
calls
'unisonance',
Anderson
resorts
to
another
time
of
narrative.
Unisonance
is
kind
of
contem­
poraneous
community
which
language
alone
suggests',
otic
speech-act
is
not
written
in
the
synchronic,
novelistic
'meanwhile',
in
a
of
meaning
that
'looms
a
horizonless
emphasis).
movement
of
the
sign
cannot
simply
in
the
emergence
of
the
realist
narrative
of
the
novel.
at
this
point
in
the
narrative
of
national
time
that
the
unisonant
discourse
produces
its
collective
identification
of
the
people,
not
as
some
transcendent
national
identity,
a
language
of
doubleness
that
arises
from
the
ambivalent
splitting
of
the
pedagogical
perform­
people
emerge
in
moment
of
their
'present'
history
as
intimation
of
simultaneity
across
homogeneous
empty
time'.
The
weight
of
the
words
of
the
national
discourse
comes
from
were-
Englishness'.
is
precisely
this
of,
when,
the
'Wlconscious
unity'
of
signification,
he
suggests
that
'language
can
only
have
arisen
all
at
once.
Things
cannot
have
(my
the present
the present
OF
CULTURE
'Qu'est
ce
qu'une
nation?'
which
has
been
the
starting
point
for
a
number
influential
accounts
Gellner,
Benedict
Anderson,
argument
the
pedagogical
function
-
the
will
a
nation
-
introduces
into
the
enunciative
present
nation
a
differential
and
iterative
time
that
interests
me.
Renan
argues
that
the
non-naturalist
principle
sented
nationhood
-
not
prior
identities
language
or
terntory.
It
will
that
unifies
historical
memory
and
The
will
is,
indeed,
the
articulation
nation's
.existence
will
pardon
the
daily
plebiscite?
Could
it
be
that
the
iterative
plebiscite
decentres
the
totalizing
pedagogy
will?
Renan's
will
the
site
minus
origin
-
that
constitutes
the
syntactical
and
moment
m
which
the
national
will
problematic
identification
national
people
becomes
visible.
The
national
subject
place
where
the
daily
plebiscite
-
the
unitary
number
-
circulates
grand
narrative
will.
However,
the
equivalence
and
plebiscite,
the
identity
whole,.
past
and
present,
across
by
the
'obligation
be
obliged
the
national
will.
That
strange
time
-
fullness,
the
represen­
tation
fullness,
the
novel
gives
evidence
profound
perplexity
living."
It
this
incommensurability
in
the
everyday
nation
speaks
its
disjunctive
narrative.
From
the
margins
at
the
insurmountable
extremes
we
encounter
the
ques­
tion
difference
as
the
perplexity
the
nation.
OF
Cultural
difference
as
the
of
polarities
in
the
homogeneous
empty
time
of
the
national
com­
munity.
The
jarring
of
meanings
and
values
generated
in
the
process
of
cultural
a
form
of
intervention,
participates
logic
of
sup­
plementary
subversion
similar
to
the
strategies
of
minority
discourse.
The
question
of
cultural
difference
faces
a
disposition
of
knowl­
distribution
of
practices
that
exist
beside
each
pther,
of
social
life
have
to

e
to
disclose
the
rationale
of
political
discrimi­
the
position
of
and,
it
not
te.artictilate
of
the
minority
that
resists
totalization
-
the
results
strategies
where
adding
not
to
disturb
the
calculation
of
power
producing
other
spaces
of
subaltern
signification.
The
of
cultural
dialogical
constituted
through
the
locus
does
represent
the
contention
non-synchronic
time
of
the
that
I
elaborated
above.
possibility
of
cultural
of
cultural
dif£erence
forms
which,
because
of
their
continual
implication
in
always
of
cultural
difference
is
. . .
tRarproduce
culture
dissemination.
As
I
have
been
arguing
throughout
such
a
critical
process
requires
a
cultural
temporality
that
is
both
disjunctive
of
articulating,
in
'forms
of
activity
which
are
both
at
once
ours
and
other'.
I
use
the
word
'traces'
to
suggest
a
particular
kind
of
transformation
that
the
analytic
of
cultural
difference
demands.
into
the
interdisciplinarity
of
cultural
means
the
emergent
cultural
form
by
locating
it
in
terms
of
some
pre-given
discursive
causality
or
origin.
always
keep
open
a
supplementary
space
for
the
articulation
of
cultural
know
ledges
that
are
adjacent
necessarily
accumulat­
ive,
teleological
or
dialectical.
of
cultural
knowledge
that
the
enemy
of
the
ation
of
knowledge
or
the
implicit
homogenization
of
experience,
which
Claude
Lefort
defines
as
the
major
strategies
of
containment
in
ideology.
Interdisciplinarity
is
the
acknowledgement
of
the
emergent
sign
of
cultural
difference
produced
in
the
ambivalent
movement
open
cleavage
in
the
language
of
culture
which
suggests
that
the
similitude
of
the
it
plays
across
cultural
sites
must
the
fact
that
play
of
symbol
and
sign
makes
interdisciplinarity
an
instance
of
the
borderline
moment
of
translation
that
describes
as
the
'foreignness
of
languages'.
nucleus
.
texts
be
total.
'the
language
envelops
signifies
a
more
exalted
language
than
its
own
and
thus
remains
unsuited
to
its
content,
overpowering
OF
it
is
the
slippage
of
signification
celebrated
articulation
of
difference,
at
the
expense
of
this
disturbing
process
of
the
overpowering
of
content
signifier.
The
erasure
of
content
invisible
structure
of
linguistic
difference
does
not
lead
some
general,
formal
acknowledgement
of
the
function
of
the
sign.
The
ill-fitting
robe
of
language
alienates
content
in
the
sense
that
access
to
a
stable
reference
'outside'
itself.
that
are
themselves
being
constituted
very
act
of
enunciation,
disjunctive,
non-equiva­
lent
split
of
undermining
the
division
of
into
Content
becomes
the
alienat­
ing
reveals
the
signifying
structure
of
linguistic
differ­
ence:
a
process
never
seen
for
itself,
glimpsed
gap
gaping
of
Benjamin's
royal
robe,
brush
peoples
within
the
the
national
culture
unisonant
discourse,
them­
selves
the
marks
of
a
shifting
boundary
that
alienates
the
frontiers
of
the
They
are
Marx's
reserve
army
of
migrant
labour
the
foreignness
of
language
split
the
patriotic
voice
of
unisonance
and
become
is
a
voice
that
opens
void
ways
similar
to
what
Abraham
describe
as
a
radical
to
his
amazement
at
first,
their
meaning
changed
as
he
spoke
them.
He
asked
for
coffee.
What
the
words
signified
to
the
barman
was
that
he
was
asking
for
coffee
in
a
bar
where
he
should
not
be
asking
for
coffee.
He
learnt
the
word
meant
when
he
used
it,
was
that
he
was
a
randy
dog.
possible
to
see
through
the
opaqueness
of
the
the
opaqueness
of
words
the
historical
memory
of
the
Western
nation
which
is
'obliged
to
the
OF
CULTURE
social
process,
the
Turk
leads
the
life
double,
the
automaton.
It
the
struggle
mechanical
reproduction
a
mere
imitation
The
opacity
of
language
fails
to
translate
or
silence
its
gesture'.
The
gesture
repeats
speech
becomes
calls
that,
Stranger,
whose
lan­
guageless
presence
evokes
an
archaic
to
redefine
Western
nation,
so
that
the
'foreignness
becomes
the
inescapable
cultural
condition
for
the
enunciation
mother-tongue.
In
the
'Rosa
Diamond'
section
seems
to
suggest
through
the
process
-
time,
peoples,
cultural
boundaries
traditions.
-
radical
alterity
national
culture
will
create
ofliving
'The
trouble
do do
the
soak
-
known
also
as
Whisky
Sisodia
-
stutters
these
words
litany
with
the
English'.
The
spirit
words
fleshes
argument
chapter.
I
have
suggested
atavistic
national
past
and
its
language
belonging
marginalize
the
present
'modernity'
national
culture,
rather
like
suggesting
happens
'outside'
the
centre
and
core.
More
specifically
I
have
argued
that
appeals
to
the
national
past
be
seen
anterior
space
larizes'
the
nation's
cultural
totality.
a
form
embodies
double
narrative
figures
ofGibreel
Farishta/Saladin
Chamcha,
or
Gibreel
Farishta/Sir
Henry
Diamond,
which
suggests
national
narrative
site
ambivalent
identification;
a
margin
uncertainty
meaning
that
may
become
the
space
for
an
agonistic
minority
position.
midst
fullness,
and
through
the
representation
fullness,
the
novel
gives
evidence
profound
perplexity
living.
Gifted
with
phantom
sight,
Rosa
Diamond,
for
Diamond,
ex-colonial
landowner,
and
through
his
postcolonial
mimicry,
exacerbates
the
discursive
split
What
significant
and
in
tension
with
the
exoticism,
emerg­
ence
hybrid
national
narrative
the
nostalgic
the
disruptive
'anterior'
the
historical
present
-
opens
it
other
histories
narrative
subjects.
The
cut
or
split
in
enunciation
emerges.
with
its
iterative
temporality
to
reinscribe
the
figure
Diamond
in
a
new
and
terrifying
avatar.
Gibreel,
the
migrant
hybrid
as
Sir
Henry
Diamond,
mimics
the
colonial
ideologies
depriving
those
narratives
imperial
authority.
Gibreel's
with
once
Gibreel
becomes
-
however
insanely
-
the
principle
·
·
make
this
land
anew.
the
Archangel,
Gibreel
-
lesson
narrative
national
memory
the
site
hybridity
and
the
displacement
then
through
Gibreel,
the
avenging
migrant,
we
learn
the
ambivalence
difference:
it
articulation
all
narratives
acts
translation.
joined
to
the
adversary,
their
arms
locked
around
one
another's
bodies,
mouth
to
mouth,
head
to
more
England
induced
ambiguities:
those
Biblical-satanic
con­
fusions
it
was
as
plain
as
the
more
practical,
earth
comprehensible
tan
standing
for
darkness;
Gibreel
for
the
light.
devilish
then
the
trouble
with
the
English
Their
-
solemnly
pronounces,
naturalised
sign
difference
trouble
with
the
English
was
their
weather,"
the
English
weather
invoke,
at
once,
the
most
change­
able
and
immanent
signs
difference.
memories
crafted
the
quilted
downs;
the
moors
menaced
by
the
wind;
the
tropicalized
London,
grotesquely
renamed
migrant's
mimicry:
it
the
city
migrants,
the
minorities,
the
diasporic
come
to
change
the
history
nation.
have
suggested
that
the
people
emerge
nation,
marking
the
liminality
identity,
producing
the
double-edged
discourse
territories
and
temporalities,
then
West,
and
increasingly
elsewhere,
it
city
which
provides
the
space
emergent
identifications
and
new
social
movements
people
are
played
out.
that,
the
perplex­
ity
living
acutely
experienced.
narrative
graftings
I
have
attempted
theory,
only
a
certain
productive
tension
perplexity
locations
I
have
taken
the
measure
occult
instability
and
Kristeva's
parallel
times
into
the
'incommensurable
narrative'
to
suggest
strange
cultural
survival
people.
For
it
on
the
borderline
and
language,
on
the
limits
and
gender,
that
position
to
translate
the
differences
same
way
a
translation,
instead
itself
similar
to
the
meaning
original,
it
ingly
and
-in
question
some
principle
freedom
fathomable.
[acques
Derrida,
bears
witness
to
the
unequal
and
uneven
forces
involved
contest
for
political
and
social
authority
within
the
order.
from
the
colonial
testimony
World
countries
and
the
discourses
within
the
geopolitical
divisions
and
West,
North
They
give
difference,'sodal
and
morrierifS-witluri·the
'rationiilliations'
[urgen
to
our·
purposes,
argue
that
the
postcolonial
project,
at
the
most
general
not
simply
a
change
contents
and
symbols;
a
replacement
within
the
same
time-frame
adequate.
a
radical
revision
social
temporality
emergent
histories
may
be
written,
the
rearticulation
cultural
identities
may
And
contingency
strategies
a
celebration
OF
CULTURE
'excess'
or
a
confront
the
concept
of
uneven,
of
social
survival.
Culture
reaches
out
an
aura
of
selfhood,
a
promise
of
pleasure.
The
not
occur
in
with
their
of
an
authentic
'past'
the
classicism.
contemporary
postcolonial
in
specific
histories
of
cultural
displacement,
political
refugees
within
the
Third
World.
Culture
is
histories
of
displacement
media
technologies
is
crucial
to
distinguish
makes
the
process
of
cultural
of
signifi­
cation.
The
natural(ized),
unifying
discourse
of
'nation',
'peoples',
or
authentic
'folk'
tradition,
those
embedded
myths
of
culture's
particu­
larity,
cannot
be
readily
referenced.
The
great,
though
THE
postcolonial
perspective
-
as
being
developed
historians
and
literary
theorists
-
departs
from
the
traditions
of
the
sociology
of
underdevelopment
theory.
mode
of
analysis,
to
revise
those
nationalist
pedagogies
that
forms
of
complex
cusp
of
cultural
value
-
the
transnational
as
the
translational
-
that
the
postcolonial
intellectual
attempts
to
elaborate
a
historical
project.
the
encounters
differential
meanings
-
r
'totalizing'
concepts,
-
-··Jn··generat:rerms;--tfiere
a
colonial
eighteenth-
question
the
analogically
links,
linear
symptoms
of
not
account
for
constitutes
incom­
of
cultural
potential
of
such
has
Jameson
to
recognize
the
'internationalization
of
the
national
situations'
in
the
postcolonial
criticism
of
Roberto
OF
CULTURE
once
remarked,
in
a
public
lecture,
that
the
postcolonial
prerogative
consisted
in
of
the
response
from
disparate
postcolonial
regions
as
a
'tremendously
then
·
J;:ru;son's
famous
reading
of
Conrad's
a
suitable
example
of
a
kind
of
reading
against
that
a
postcolonial
represents
the
fundamen­
tal
ambivalences
of
the
of
late
moment
when
he
is
in
danger
of
being
cast
out,
or
made
outcast,
manifestly
of
us'.
discursive
ambivalence
very
heart
of
the
issue
of
honour
the
colonial
service
represents
the
liminality,
if
not
the
end,
masculinist,
heroic
ideal
(and
ideology)
of
a
healthy
imperial
Englishness
-
those
pink
bits
on
the
Conrad
believed
were
genuinely
salvaged
the
preserve
of
English
colonization,
which
served
the
larger
idea,
and
ideal,
of
Western
civil
POSTCOLONIAL
POSTMODERN
problematic
issues
are
activated
within
the
terms
of
postcolonial
critique
as
the
cultural
relations
profolll,lg.J!mi­
of
a
consensual
'liberal'
sense
of
cultural
com­
of
class
.
notions
of
cultural
"
.
.
.
.
the
becomes
as
the
public
private
-
as
its
resplendent
being
is
a
moment
of
pleasure,
enlightenment
dimension,
both
within
the
margins
of
the
structUralist
emerges
from
this
postcolonial
contramodernity.
to
represent
a
certain
defeat,
of
the
'West'
authorization
of
the
'idea'
of
colonization.
of
the
margins
of
modernity
-
rather
failures
measure,
to
revise
.
"
'.
.
OF
CULTURE
of
contemporary
is
both
-
gender,
race,
homophobia,
the
international
division
of
labour,
not
only
differ
in
content
distinct
a
is
based
articulation
of
differential,
even
disjunctive,
moments
of
history
contemporary
critics
resort
to
the
pecul­
iar
temporality
of
the
as
arbitrariness
of
the
sign,
the
. . .
writing
from
the
perspective
of
the
fragmented,
marginal­
discriminated
against
members
of
a
post-
Thatcherite
underclass,
questions
the
sententiousness
of
left
orthodoxy
where
a
unilinear
political
logic,
driven
abstract
entity
that
the
economic
or
capital
unfolding
to
its
pre-ordained
in
his
book,
he
uses
the
linguistic
sign
as
a
THE
in
quotation
marks
and
always
complex,
a
suturing
of the
cultural
emerges
the
of
identi
that
it
r
m a
centre:
in
bo
senses,
ex-centric.
In
Britain
today
art
and
from
the
left,
associated
with
the
postcolonial
experience
of
migration
and
diaspora
and
articulated
in
the
cultural
exploration
of
new
of the
difference.
It
creates
a
signifying
time
for
the
inscription
of
cultural
incommensurability
where
differences
cannot
be
sublated
or
totalized
because
'they
somehow
occupy
the
same
space'.
form
of
cultural
identification
that
is
relevant
to
proposal
for
a
for
judgements.
The
effect
of
cultural
incommensurability
is
beyond
merely
points
us
toward
the
human
of
gives
the
value
of
rationality
its
,
the
activity
of
articulation
embodied
in
the
of
culture
from
an
epistem()logical
an
enunciative
epfstemologiCai
relocate
the
and
hierarch
(hign/low;··ours/tlieliSflil"tl\e'
enunciative
is
a
.more
OF
CULTURE
attempts-to-track.
the
effects
the
hegemoru(ftlo#ient
-
. .
·
'ative
to
closure
hurtled
rapidly
forward
the
dizzying
motions
of
a
symbolic
enterprise,
increasingly
clear
cultural
synthesis
homogenous
practices
faces
yielded.
McDowell,
of
Williams's
that
the
temporality
enunciatory
'
discourses
sententiousness
the
'very,
very
which
comes
through
vibrantly
title
of
his
essay
his
perceptive
introduction
to
feminist
criticism,
Gates,
the
contestations
feminists
as
empowering
cultural
strategies
precisely
because
position
they
occupy
is
free
of
the
'inverted'
polarities
of
a
of
exclusion':
They
have
never
been
obsessed
with
arriving
subject;
boundaries
. . .
The
contingent
liminal
become
the
times
the
historical
representation
of
the
cultural
difference
in
a
postcolonial
criticism.
enacted
in
.the
multi_a,ccentual-
this
arbitrary
also
the
of
historical
ordering
of
cultural
African
_
theory.
of
cultural
experience
and
identity
is
envisaged
itself
is
particularly
emergent
reality
the
'author'.
it
a
representation
of
social
experience
as
the
contingency
of
history
-
the
not.simply
eru;gunter
theory
/practice,
of
the
two
-
lcmguage
and-pelitiGs
productive
relation
similar
to
Derrida's
notion
of
OF
CULTURE
a
structure
predication,
which
cannot
itself
predicates
that
this
a
lack
of
power;
rather
this
inability
is
constitutive
of
the
very
possibility
of
the
logic
of
identity.
the
inner
speech
of
the
writer
the
exorbitant
space
of
the
Moroccan
souk:
[T]hrough
words,
syntagms,
bits
of
formulae
and
formed,
as
though
were
the
law
of
such
a
language.
very
cultural
savage,
was
above
all
lexical,
sporadic;
it
some
of
the
major
themes
of
contemporary
theory
prefigured
in
the
practice
of
semiotics-
the
author
as
ive
space;
the
formation
of
textuality
after
the
fall
of
linguistics;
the
agonism
POSTCOLONIAL
POSTMODERN
dramatized
in
the
liberty
(perhaps
libertinism)
of
the
signifier.
Barthes's
daydream
is
to
acknowledge
the
formative
contribution
of
semiotics
to
those
influential
concepts
-
sign,
text,
limit
text,
idiolect,
have
become
all
the
more
important
since
they
have
passed
into
the
unconscious
of
our
critical
trade.
When
Bar­
thes
attempts
to
produce,
with
his
suggestive,
erratic
brilliance,
a
space
for
the
pleasure
of
the
text
somewhere
to
hold
fast
the
political
line
while
the
semiotic
cups,
to
Q{Jhe
the
daydream
takes
semiotics
pedagogy
into
the
explor­
ation
of
its
seek
simply
the
sententious
'outside
the
sentence',
in
Barthes's
con­
cept,
is
that
of
the
fall
of
a
predict­
able,
predicative
linguistics,
the
space
of
the
non-sentence
is
not
a
nega-
tive
ontology:
is
indeed
one
of
sentence'
is
voice;
the
OF
timeless
stages
such
Richard
Rorty's
term,
is
in
the
doubleness
of
very
cultural
savage',
that
were
the
law
of
such
a
language'.
calls
the
occidental
the
ontologi­
cal,
circumscribing
space
the
question
of
agency,
as
it
emerges
in
relation
to
the
outside
the
sentence,
beyond
the
occidental
ster­
eotomy,
is
shall
call
the
'temporality'
of
Tangiers.
a
structure
of
temporality
that
only
slowly
as
time
goes
by,
as
they
say
in
Moroccan
bars,
this
a
kiss
is
still
a
sigh
is
sigh
the
fundamental
As
times
goes
again,
Sam',
which
is
perhaps
the
Western
world's
most
cele­
brated
demand
for
THE
the
the
'non-sentence'?
to
conceive
of
discourSe
outsiae"ffie.-sen­
tence?
apprehensions
about
the
agency
of
the
libertarian
because
'sign'
of
the
'non-sentence'
turns
'jointed
predication'.
sense,
closure
comes
to
be
effected
in
the
contingent
moment
of
LOCATION
OF
CULTURE
space
that
one
cannot
not
inhabit
[the
sentence,
sententious],
the
with
the
social
in
relation
Barthes,
is
neither
the
'expressive'
function
of
lan­
guage
as
authorial
intention
is
similar
to
the
this
'noise'
is
the
'leftover'
after
the
of
the
signifier
for
the
sub­
ject.
The
Lacanian
'voice'
that
speaks
outside
the
sentence
is
itself
the
voice
of
calculative
agency:
telling
it,
at?'
(For
a
clear
explanation
of
this
process,
see
Zizek,
Jacques Lacan
neither
nor
my
inter­
locutor'.32
The
time-lag
opens
negotiatory
space
THE
sly
civility,
is
that
this
liminal
cation
-
eluding
resemblance
-
produces
a
subversive
strategy
tern
agency
its
through
a
process
'unpicking'
insurgent
relinking.
larizes
the
'totality'
of
authority
that
agency
requires
a
grounding,
a
totalization
grounds;
it
requires
movement
a
temporality
of
continuity
it
requires
direction
(For
elaboration
concepts,
see
Chapters
1
The
individuation
agent
occurs
a
pulsional
split-second
movement
process
subject's
designation
-
its
it,
uncannily
supplementary
space
the
sen­
its
time-lag
the
elements
can
the
general.
The
iterative
relation
as
realized
Spillers,
McDowell,
Baker,
Gates
all
the
of
binary
closures.
I
give
contingency
-::·oytllrOwing
last
line
text,
its
conclusion,
OF
suggestively
of
closure
as
agency.
Once
again,
we
have
lap
without
equivalence.
For
the
notion
of
a
non-teleological
non­
dialectical
form
of
closure
has
often
been
considered
the
most
oroblem-
atic
issue
for
the
aloud]
succeed[s]
the
signified
a
great
distance
and
in
throwing,
so
to
speak,
the
anonymous
the
actor
into
this
bliss
is
also
at
the
a
very
complex
process
of
biographical,
historical,
sociological,
neurotic
elements
I
control
the
con­
tradictory
interplay
of
[cultural]
pleasure
bliss
that
I
write
myself
as
a
subject
at
present
place.
agent
is
articulated
in
a
double
dramatic
action.
space
Then,
suddenly,
this
itself
into
the
temporality
of
the
'throw'
that
iteratively
(re)tums
the
subject
as
a
moment
of
conclusion
and
control:
a
historically
specific
subject.
we
to
think
the
control
clusion
context
of
contingency?
not
surprisingly,
to
invoke
both
meanings
of
to
repeat
the
difference
of
the
one
in
the
other.
Recall
that
to
interrupt
the
occidental
space/time
-
one
needs
to
think,
outside
the
sentence,
at
once
very
cultural
and
very
savage.
e
contingent
is
the
the
is
the
of
contingency
-
where
the
spatial
dimension
of
contiguity
is
reiterated
in
the
temporality
of
the
inscribed
in
two
major
the
embodied
in
THE
Raj'.
The
denied
capacity
leaders,
belong
to
gentry.
Radical
historiography
failed
to
specify
rebel
because
its
continuist
narrative
ranged
'peasant
revolts
as
a
suc­
cession
ranged
along
a
direct
line
a
heritage'.
consciousness
to
the
'highest
-
indeed
to
Consciousness'
-
these
'are
ill-equipped
to
cope
with
contradictions
which
are
indeed
the
stuff
history
contradiction
as
consciousness
are
strongly
suggestive
as
the
activity
contingent.
What
I
as
the
account
consciousness
as
self-alienated.
that
the
problematic
reading
close
strategic
the
'combination
of
sectarianism
cally]
the
such
phenomena';
causality
as
the
'time'
describes
the
'ambiguity
phenomena'
as
the
hybridized
signs
movement
Muslim
peasants
[came]
to
the
Kisan
Sabha
OF
CULTURE
agency
also
take
the
heart
genres,
to.desigriate.the
with
Guha,
my
read­
ing
will
reading
agency
as
of
the
intersubjec­
distance,
to
terms
somewhat
-
enables
see
how
Bakhtin
provides
a
knowledge
. . .
the
spalialooundaries
of
the
object
of
utterance
are
contiguous
in
the
assimilation
of
the
other's
speech;
allusion
to
another's
utterance
produces
a
dialogical
moment
of
Bakhtin
acknowledges
this
double
movement
in
the
chain
of
the
utterance,
there
is
a
sense
he
disavows
its
effectivity
at
the
point
of
the
discursive
agency.
He
displaces
this
conceptual
problem
that
concerns
the
performativity
of
the
speech­
act
-
its
enunciative
modalities
of
time
-
to
the
'area
of
life
to
given
utterance
is
related'.
not
that
the
social
context
does
not
localize
the
utterance;
simply
that
the
process
of
specifi­
cation
and
individuation
still
needs
to
be
elaborated
within
Bakhtin's
theory,
as
the
modality
through
which
the
speech
genre
comes
to
recog­
nize
the
specific
as
a
signifying
limit,
a
discursive
boundary.
There
are
moments.
when
Bakhtin
obliquely
touches
tense
doubling
of
the
contingent
that
I
When
he
talks
of
the
THE
overtones'
that
permeate
the
agency
of
concealed
or
utterance
appears
to
with
distant
audible
echoes
of
changes
of
speech
subjects
over­
tones,
greatly
weakened
utterance
boundaries
that
are
to
very
complex
to
its
this
landscape
of
echoes
boundaries,
framed
furrowed
horizons,
the
agent
who
is
indeed,
time-lagged,
emerges
into
the
social
realm
of
discourse.
Agency,
as
the
The
agency
bears
that
must
become
for
the
manifestation
of
the
the
are
separated;
the
narrative
time-lag
makes
the
splitting
them,
so
that
.the
agent
outside.
the
sentence.
The
agent
narrative
becomes
the
interest,
point
unequivocally
to
that
agent
contingency
OF
CULTURE
constitutes
individuation
-
then
of
events
outcome.is-.noLunequhro.cally
not
suggest
that
agency
arises
in
the
of
the
series
of
events
as
a
kind
of
interrogation
and
reinscription
of
before
Where
the
two
touch
is
there
not
that
existence
of
the
political?
Here
Arendt
resorts
to
a
form
of
in
all
arts
actually
appropriate
to
the
drama'.
the
public
sphere,
that
is
largely
consensual:
'where
people
are
and
neither
for
nor
against
is
sheer
human
people
are
passionately
for
or
against
one
another,
then
human
THE
is
articulations
dissent
antagonism
cannot
find
their
agents
Aristotelian
mimesis.
process
I've
described
as


1 b
a
historical
development
is
agent's
intentionality,
which
directed'
towards
the
the
order
imaginary,
is
also
subjectivity
(because
intersubjective)
level
contingent
tension
possi'6Ie
in--the
thesynCllroii.ous
flow
LOCATION
CULTURE
concept
of
reinscription
that
I
must
not
be
confused
with
the
powers
of
'redescription'
that
have
become
the
hallmark
of
the
liberal
ironist
or
offer
a
critique
of
this
influential
non-foundationalist
position
here
except
to
point
to
the
obvious
differences
of
approach.
Rorty's
conception
of
the
representation
of
difference
in
social
discourse
is
the
consensual
overlapping
of
'final
vocabularies'
that
allow
imaginative
identification
with
the
other
so
long
as
certain
words
-
-
held
in
common.
as
says,
the
liberal
ironist
can
never
elaborate
strategy.
Just
how
disempowering
his
views
are
for
the
non-Western
other,
how
steeped
in
a
Western
suggestion
that
governments
should
optimize
the
balance
where Rorty's
THE
of
the
subaltern
that
displaces
the
as
a
form
diScourse
·where
ahd'
Wrlting
its
guage.
History
as
a
writing
that
constructs
the
moment
of
defiance
emerges
'magma
of
significations',
for
the
'representational
closure
which
presents
itself
when
thought
forms
is
open.
Instead
we
see
this
order
interrogated.'
ment
that
demands
temporality
remarkably
close
to
of
the
time-lag
that
circulates
point
of
the
sign's
seizure/
caesura
of
symbolic
synchronicity,
Das
locates
the
moment
of
into statements
of
utterance
enables
the
as
I've
argued,
there
is
neither
suBlation
the
empty
signifier:
there
is
a
contestation
of
the
given
symbols
of
authority
that
shift
the
terrains
of
antagonism.
The
synchronicity
in
the
social
ordering
of
symbols
is
challenged
grounds
of
engagement
have
been
a
supplementary
movement
that
exceeds
those
terms.
This
is
the
historical
movement
of
hybridity
as
a
contesting,
antagonistic
agency
functioning
time
lag
of
sign/symbol,
which
is
a
space
contingent
structure
of
agency
not
similar
to
Fanon
describes
as
the
knowledge
of
the
practice
of
action?
of
come
to
..
the
tide
stand
firmly
against
those
movement
who
tend
to
'shades
of
meaning
constitute
dangers
wedges
into
the
solid
block
of
OF
opinion'.
Das
both
describe
is
the
potentiality
of
agency
constituted
through
the
strategic
use
of
historical
contingency.
The
form
of
agency
that
I've
attempted
to
describe
through
the
cut
of
sign
and
symbol,
the
signifying
conditions
of
contingency,
the
night-time
of
love,
from
Australia
to
India,
has
not
been
unqualified,
particularly
construction
of
modernity.
Mitchell
Dean,
writing
in
the
Melbourne
journal
that
the
identity
of
the
West's
modernity
obsessively
remains
'the
most
general
horizon
under
which
all
of
Fou­
cault's
actual
historical
analyses
are
landmarked'.
for
this
very
reason,
Partha
Chatterjee
argues
that
Foucault's
genealogy
of
power
uses
in
the
developing
world.
The
combination
of
regimes
of
power
produces
unexpected
forms
of
disciplinarity
that
epistemes
inappropriate,
even
could
Foucault's
text,
which
bears
such
relation
to
Western
modernity,
of
that
epistemic
displacement
-
through
the
(post)colonial
formation
-
that
constitutes
the
West's
sense
of
itself
as
progressive,
civil,
modem?
Does
the
disavowal
of
colonialism
'sign'
of
the
West
into
the
symptom
of
mod­
ernity?
Can
the
colonial
moment
-
the
contiguous
the
section
confronts
its
uncanny
doubles
-
the
counter-sciences
of
anthropology
-
the
argument
unravel.
It
happens
at
a
symptomatic
moment
when
the
representation
of
cultural
difference
attenuates
the
sense
of
history
as
the
embedding,
domesticat­
ing
'homeland'
of
the
For
the
finitude
of
history
-
its
moment
of
doubling
-
participates
in
the
conditionality
of
the
contin­
gent.
doubleness
ensues
to
him
from
somewhere
other
constitutes
himself
as
a
subject
of
history
only
superimpo-
sition
of
history
of
things,
the
history
of
words
this
relation
of
simple
passivity
is
immediately
reversed
he
too
historical subject
of
con
I
have
explored
this
historical
process,
perfectly
caught
in
the
picturesque
words
of
a
desperate
missionary
early
the
'slenderness
of
the
narra­
tive'
of
history
in
most
renowned
for
its
historiciiing
(and
colonizing)
of
the
world
word.
place
outer
limits
of
the
object
Foucault
writes,
to
probe
the
uncanny
unconscious
of
history's
he
resorts
to
anthropology
In
these
disciplines
the
cultural
unconscious
is
spoken
slenderness
of
narrative
-
ambivalence,
catachresis,
contingency,
iteration,
abyssal
over­
lapping.
agonistic
temporal
break
the
cultural
sym:bol
to
the
psychic
sign,
discover
the
postcolonial
symptom
of
Writing
of
the
history
of
anthropology
as
the
'counter-discourse'
to
the
possibility
of
a
Foucault
says:
There
is
a
certain
position
in
the
Western
was
constituted
history
and
provides
a
foundation
for
the
relation
have
with
all
other
Foucault
should
reinstate
colonialism
as
the
missing
moment
in
the
dialectic
of
modernity?
OF
CULTURE
thought
following
progress.
Then,
suddenly,
at
the
point
closure,
a
curious
THE
dehistoricized
figure
at
the
cost
'others'
-
women,
natives,
the
colonized,
the
indentured
and.
enslaved
-
who,
at
the
same
time
spaces,
were
becoming
the
peoples
history.
pressure
annoyances
that
there
conspiracy
against
inquirer
often
sees
a
conspiracy,
when
there
coincidence.
A
great
disaster
hidden
writings
historical
agency
enacted
in
the
slenderness
we
historicize
the
dehistoricized?
If,
as
they
say,
the
a
foreign
country,
then
it
encounter
a
agency
emerge
discursive
time-lag;
in
the
contingent
tension
BREAD
-
the
signs
-
emerge
from
the
'time-lag',
from
the
stressed
absence
that
arrest,
a
ceasure
a
temporal
break.
specifying
slave
history,
through
an
act
memory,
Toni
Morrisonnegates
narrative
continuity
and
the
cacophonous
comfort
cryptic
very
first
word,
displacement
'personalized'
predication
that
speaks
the
presence
slave
world:
'124
was
spiteful.
Full
The
women
house
knew
it
and
so
did
the
children."
habitus
and
the
daemonic,
reverberates
a
form
sign
-
which
world
And
then
suddenly
from
the
space
the
re-membered
historical
agency
'manifestly,
directed
towards
the
rediscovery
which
lies
order
(see
act
and
intention
effected
attempt
a
form
that
own
discursive
activity,
pasted
on
desire
for
personality'S
(what
I
have
called
individuation,
And
this
creation
ofhistorical
agency
produces
the
sub­
ject
temporality
contingent:
'snatched
were
from
one
place
from.
any
place
to
another,
without
preparation
and
without
defense
reader
yanked,
thrown
into
an
environment
link
this
sign
from
the
the
world
circulation
signs
and
central
India.
I
want
from
the
tortured
history
Indian
Mutiny.
connection
not
on
a
sense
contiguity
'but
on
the
temporality
interested
strategy
and
political
confrontation
constituted
engimatic
symbols,
the
manic
tease
slenderness
that,
major
agrarian
causes
Indian
Mutiny,
tells
'chapatis'
(unleavened
flat
bread)
rapidly
circulated
across
the
rural
heartlands
the
introduction-into
the
Native
Infantries
Enfield
rifle
notorious
'greased'
cartridge.
the
chapati
story
as
one
main.
illustrations
'symbolic'
transmission
agency.
iterative
action
our,
its
-
as
one
Rumour
are,
crises,
double
sites
their
stories
disjunctive
'present'
or
the
'not­
there'
My
to
Ashis
on
Western
historicism
essay
"Iowards
a
Third
World
Utopia'.
The
suffering
World'
time
memories
at
[that]
allow
greater
play
defensive
rigidity.
few
even
questioning
obedience
to
greater
signal
aration,
designed
to
tell
the
people
authority
wrote
to
the
Governor-general
told
chapati
was
the
symbol
food,
circulation
was
intended
to
alarm
influence
by
indicating
to
them
means
would
be
taken
from
them,
and
to
tell
them
therefore,
to
scorn
this
notion
fiery
cross,
saw
only
a
common
superstition
country.
said
was
no
unwonted
thing
for
a
Hindu,
family
sickness
out,
to
institute
this
transmission
belief
disease.
Then,
again,
it
was
believed
to
the
circulation
[of
the
chapatis]
was
another
fiction,
was
bone
English
to
this
supplementary
the
effect
alive
much
districts
through
which
the
cakes
were
transmitted
saw
much
meaning;
some
.saw
none.
Tune
has
thrown
no
still
differ.
CULTURE
History
with
any
certainty
bearers
strange
place
to
place;
and
excitements
were
engendered,
were
raised."
(My
emphasis)
other
principalities,
created
a
sense
dislocation
effects
within
an
mainly
ies.
The
Native
Infantry
the
rebellion
mainly
influx
castes
into
their
ranks
result
radical
'levelling'
policies
Government
-
has
described"
-
led
to
such
a
widespread
sense
confusion
Mutiny,
wrote
to
the
.subadar
because
he
so,
gentleman
less
so
because
we
treat
him
tradesman.?"
I
have
prised
open,
once
space
not
simply
rendering
account,
passages
simply
from'
the
native
the
superior
CULTURE
perspective
Canning.
While
he
largely
attributes
fear
to
a
its
superstition
prehensions,
its
'pre-formed'
psychological
pliability,
the
gathering'
the
discourse
fact
fear
to
the
peasants.
The
natives,
subjects
act
-
experienced
men,
one
great
authority,
others
laughing,
others
'British'
authorities,
after
the
annexation
mission
which
was
a
mystery
to
the
Europeans'.
Like
the
chapati,
the
Maulvi's
circulation
at
Mirath,
at
Calcutta'!"
the
discourse
the
cal
understanding,
then
we
encounter
a
temporal
'speed'
events
to
agency.
The
chapati's
circulation
bears
a
contingent
relation
to
the
time-lag
or
temporal
break
OF
CULTURE
revolutionary
consciousness
which
enables
the
peasantry
to
emphasis)
the
emergence
of
rebel
agency
in
the
'negative
condition'
of
social
existence,
Guha
refers
to
'social
psychosis'
as
the
structure
of
insurgency.
that
the
organizing
prin­
ciple
of
the
the
chapati
constituted
in
the
transmission
of
where it
level
of
narra­
tive
positionality
spreading,
uncontrolled
fear
the
colonizer.
contingent,
borderline
experience
opens
visible
meaning
emerges
time-lag,
break,
Kaye's
very
predicament
can
record
with
is,
to
place.'
this
temporal
process
"ti'ansihl5sion
agency
about
which
to
panic,
as
it
is
historical
narrative,
is
a
breaks
stereotomy
of
In
so
doing
it
reveals
process
inside
a .
'not-there'
(Morrison)
(Kaye)
discourse of
In
then,
the
extimate
woUld
seriality
of
the
historical
event
(1857),
the
site
politics,
the
temporality
writing
of
history.
of
touc:lt.te.comes
-·-1Urat.groups,
homogeneous
polarized
political
consciousnesses.
The
political
psychosis
constitutes
the
bound-
hybrldity
which
the
Mutiny
is
fought.
symbols,
their
indigenous
discourse of
also
a
displacement
of,
against,
the
Enfield
rifle;
contaminated
with
bone-meal
'English
ships-biscuits'
the
chapatis
are
a
the
temporality
of
the
historical
event
as
(psychic,
CULTURE
instance
external
(political,
institutional,
governmental)
occurrence
have
been
trying
to
explore
within
the
sipahi
It
has
been
my
agency
effective.
because
it
rides
on
the
disjunctive
or
displaced
circulation
Would
such
an
ambivalent
borderline
from
specifying
a
political
strategy
or
identifying
a
historical
event?
contrary,
it
forms
struggle.
After
all
my
chapatis
help
to
explain
the
puzzle
timing
to
longer­
term
trends
Indian
history'.
new
emphasis
on
the
contin­
symbolic
visible
fine
'passage
where
Stokes
writes:
wore
clothing
frequent
renewal.
Its
tatterdemalion
appearance
was
also
than
symbolic
significance.
the
British
might
dispense
with
regular
uniform
.and
strict
puntilio,
the
crisis
was
passed
regiments
multiplied,
their
military
practice
tight­
ened
rather
For
the
sepoys
the
from
outcome
rebellion
Stokes
right
to
assert,
as
he
does
repeatedly,
defeat
rebels
came
from
the
'absence
tactical
plan
or
organization
to
press
home
cable
understanding
disciplines
regular
soldier
guerilla
tactics
civil
insurgent,
adherence
to
a
certain
notion
not
to
see
the
doubled,
displaced
strategy
insurgent.
taste
for
to
inside-out
movement
civil
two
sites
agency.
.
very
few
contemporary
'native'
narratives
available,
written
from
the
scene
Munshee
Mohan
Lal's
account
overheard
conversation
Delhi!
-
does
provide
loose-knit
unity
to
excited
Stokes
describes
rebel
account
makes
quite
clear
only
after
they
tested
their
strength
fighting
body,
and
symbolically
houses
'saheb
Iogue'
called
a
CULTURE
. . .
its
topi.
After
the
reorganization
Madras
Army
all
the
tra­
ditional
accoutrements
native
soldier's
appearance
were
effaced.
Ear-rings
were
obliterated,
the
The
sipahi
was
shaved
stiff
round
hat,
like
a
pariah
a
flat
top,
a
leather
cockade
standing
feather"."
eyes
countrymen
the
soldier
became
a
'topiwalla',
a
hat­
wearer,
synonymous
with
being
a
'firinghi'
or
Christian.
Rumours
began
to
circulate
imminent
conversion
to
Christianity
through
the
contagion
leather
hat.
anxious
times
filth
about
strange
stories
fables,
within
the
military
lines.
The
unmistakable
stirrings
could
be
heard,
swiftly
carried
on
the
wings
through
the
bazaars,
the
countryside,
the
barracks.
Just
before
the
great
massacre
at
Vellore
the
history
books
tell
us,
an
so
common
historians
seem
to
have
forgotten
the
soldiers
new
'firinghi'
topis
mingled
with
the
palace
servants
BREAD
a
cross
person.
But
the
round
object
taunts
people
palace.
'It
only
needed
this
to
make
you
ENTERS
THE
space,
postcolonial
times
trials
of
cultural
translation
passes
through
transformation,
not
abstract
ideas
of
identity
and
similarity.
as
such
and
the
language
of
man'
is
radical
perversity,
political
wisdom,
that
drives
the
intriguing
knowledge
of
postcolonial
discourse.
Why
else
long
shadow
of
Conrad's
many
texts
of
the
postcolonial
pedagogy?
has
much
in
the
anti-foundationalist,
the
universe
is
best
preserved
the
conversation
of
humankind
going.
And
so
he
does,
in
that
intricate
end-game
that
is
best
known
to
readers
of
the
novel
as
the
'lie'
to
the
Intended.
Although
the
African
wilderness
has
followed
the
lofty
drawing-room
of
Europe,
with
its
spectral,
monumental
whiteness,
despite
the
dusk
that
menacingly
whispers
the
Horror',
Marlow's
narrative
keeps
faith
with
the
gendered
conventions
of
a
civil
discourse
where
women
are
blinded
because
they
they cannot
Conradian
runes
much·
because
their
depths
contain
is
visible
'outside,
enveloping
the
tale
which
brought
it
a
glow
brings
merely
repress
the
'however
multivocal
and
multi­
valent
as
much
as
he
enacts
a
ENTERS
THE
the
Intended
-
to
daemonic
geography
of
memoriill
to
Marlow
of
colonialism
is
the
problem
·
·
is
this
locutions
into
the
the
signification
narratives
void
attending
every
assimilation
territory
acknowledgement
necessary
Such
'overdramatized'
images
are
precisely
as
I
attempt
to
negotiate
narratives
where
double-lives
are
led
onial
world,
journeys
dwellings
diasporic.
These
subjects
of
the
experience
OF
incotporated
into
the
analytic
construction
of
the
object
of
critical
attention:
narratives
of
the
borderline
conditions
of
cultures
plines.
For
Samuel
Weber
describes
the
symbolic
structure
of
psychic
volume
other
Marxist
its
centralization
in
the
idealized
categories,
towards
the
the
media
to
suggest
that
the
demographic
and
unpact
minorities
be
crucial
in
conceiving
of
the
Jameson,
doubly
As
the
naming
of
a
historical
multinational
capitalism
-
postmodernity
provides
the
periodizing
narrative
of
the
global
trans­
formations
of
capital.
But
schema
is
radically
dis­
rupted
postmodem
as
an
ENTERS
THE
charge
one
could
just
as
well
imagine
positive
terms
of
euphoria,
a
high,
(p.
passage
from
essay,
'The
cultural
logic
of
late
exemplary
amongst
Marxist
readings
of
poststructur­
alism
for
transforming
the
'schizophrenic
disjunction'
(p.
cultural
style,
into
a
politically
effective
discursive
space.
The
recourse
to
has
implications
that
go
beyond
Jameson's
suggestive,
OF
CULTURE
world. From
. . .
ENTERS
THE
the
free-standing,
disjoined
sentences,
to
which
Jameson
insistently
draws
our
attention.
a
disintegrative
mmneilt-even
fragmented
and
of
the
the
individual
this
relation
to
the
'unrepresentable'
as
a
domain
of
difference,
one
is
led
to
question
the
of
Jameson's
'third
space'.
The
space
of
'thirdness'
in
postmodem
politics
opens
of
'interfection'
(to
use
Jame­
son's
term)
where
the
newness
of
cultural
practices
and
historical
narra­
tives
are
registered
in
'generic
discordance',
'unexpected
juxtaposition',
'the
semiautomization
of
reality',
'postmodem
schizo-fragmentation
as
opposed
to
the
subject's
relation
to
social
totality
-
the
germ
of
an
entire
generation
of
scholarly
essays
-
is
to
be
found
in
the
camivalesque
description
of
that
postmodem
panopticon,
the
Bonaventure
Hotel.
trope
that
echoes
the
disorientation
of
language
and
location
that
accompanies
Marlow's
journey
Congo,
Jameson
shoots
the
rapids
elevator-gondola
and
lands
in
the
milling
confusion
of
the
lobby.
Here,
in
the
hotel's
hyperspace,
your
bearings
entirely.
the
dramatic
217
OF
are
faced
incapacity
great
global
multinational
encounter
with
the
global
dialectic
unrep­
resentable,
there
underlying,
concluding
meditation
on
the
subject,
'Secondary
elaborations',
Jameson
elaborates
perceptual
capacity
kind
not
pull
the
eyes
back
into
focus
entertains
the
tension
multiple
coordinates
felt
as
such.
Different
moments
or
existential
time
are
here
simply
filed
places;
the
combine
them
even
locally
does
temporal
scale
across
a
game
board
conceptualize
emphasis)
(pp.
372-3)
Although
[ameson
commences
by
elaborating
the
'sensorium'
decentred,
multinational
new
world
(b)order',
Guillermo
performance
artist
ENTERS
THE
stubborn
chunks
are
to
float.
Such
fantastic
renamings
subjects
difference"
their
discursive
authority
from
anterior
causes
-
be
it
or
historical
necessity
-
which,
secondary
move,
articulate
essential
the
incommensurable
elements
-
the
stubborn
chunks
-
basis
identifications.
issue
performative
nature
identities:
the
regulation
spaces
continually,
out',
remaking
the
boundaries,
exposing
the
limits
claim
to
a
singular'
or
autonomous
sign
-
be
it
class,
race.
Such
assignations
differences-
where
difference
concept
action):
'a,
transferential
whereby
the
present,
so
future
becomes
(once
again)
an
specified
by
the
fixity
past.?"
The
iterative
'time'
future
available
to
marginalized
or
minority
identities'
a
mode
agency
has
elaborated
sexuality:
'a
specificity
be
established,
or
reiteration,
very
modality
dispels
the
potential
a
'third'
politics
or
the
(b)order',
social
into
cultural
'distance',
interstitial,
conflictual
be
neither
developmental
nor
linear
scale'),
into
the
topoi
separation.
Through
the
'regulatory,
spatial
dialectic
-
the
eye
storm
-
the
'class-subject'
itself.
makes
the
teleological
dimension
class
category
OF
axes
of
transnational
globality,
then
the
linear,
developmental
dimension
back
the
innovative
s c
lost.
as
he
does
to
suggest,
in
sympathy
with
'totalizing'
is
not
access
to
totality
with
the
boundary,
like
a
loose
tooth'
(p.
is
little
doubt
that
for
Jameson
the
boundary
of
knowledge,
prerequisite
of
critical
structure
of
social
causality
requires
tl\e
division
·recurs
in
his
later
of
its
recommendation
simul­
in
in
outstde,tts
context,
its
space
of
mtervention
the present
formula
in
which
a
representation
of
social
relations
as
such
now
demands
the
mediation
of
this
interposed
ENTERS
structure
from
which
read
off
indirectly.
(p.
the
historical
difference
of
the
present
is
articulated
a
third
system
as
a
its
interstitial
cultural
temporality
-
communicational
structure
-
is
allowed
to
embellish,
interrupt,
the
. . .
community'
Anderson's
'imagined
community'
have
been
altered
migration
political
groupings
of
be
found
in
the
simulacral
superficies
of
media
practices
of
the
culture
produce
of
a
more
narrative
kind.'
The
construc­
tion
of
poJitical
solidarities
'pseudo-dialectical'
unless
their
alignment
is
the
identity
(as
the
equivalence
or,
for
instance,
the
linkage
of
social
legitimate
--
class.
OF
reading
of
Jameson's
class
analysis,
it
may
be
argued,
does
little
justice
to
his
innovative
image
of
the
social
actor
as
a
'third
term
non-centred
subject
that
is
group
(p.
learnt
that
this
appeal
to
a
'thirdness'
structure
of
dialectical
thought
is
both
of
the
disjunctive
cultural
'signs'
of
these
(posbnodem)
times,
symptom
of
Jameson's
inability
to
move
beyond
the
binary
dialectic
of
inside
and
outside,
base
His
innovative
conception
of
subject,
as
a
decentred
the
moment
of
History's
true
guarantee
the
ability
to
social
representation.
He
categories
are
more
material,
more
impure
mixed,
which
their
categGty·of-dass,
corrilriunal
are
transformed
into
terms
specularity
of
class
consciousness
provides
race
and
gender
with
its
interpellative
structure,
then
of
collective
social
identity
can
be
designated
without
its
as
a
form
of
class
identity.
Class
identity
is
autoreferential,
surmounting
other
instances
of
social
sovereignty
is
also,
Class
categories
that
provide
a
clear
view
to
the
stream's
rocky
then caught
narcissism
can
articulate
'other'
subjects
of
difference
and
forms
of
cultural
alterity
as
either
ENTERS
THE
WORLD
compensatory
realities
rather
have
the
class
category
as
narcissistic,
I
have
to
the
complexity
of
Jameson's
ambivalence.
For
perhaps,
a
that
gazes
the
bottom
of
the
stream.
situation
in
which,
for
a
time,
genuine
(or
totalising)
politics
is
no
longer
possible',
Jameson
concedes,
one's
responsibility
to
just
such
symptoms
the
global
dimension,
to
the
ideological
resistance
to
the
concept
of
vigilance
is
the
value
invested
in
the
visible
difference
of
class
that
does
him
to
constitute
the
present
moment
as
the
insignia
of
other
interstitial
inscriptions
of
cultural
difference.
autotelic
specularity
of
the
class
category
witnesses
the
historic
loss
of
its
priority,
there
emerges
the
possibility
of
a
politics
of
social
difference
that
makes
no
autotelic
claims
-
'capable
of
genuinely
articulatory
understanding
that
to
represented
representative
-
limits
of
specularity
have
to
inscription
of
otherness.
the
problem
of
global
space
from
the
postcolonial
does
the
narrative
construction
of
minority
discourses
the
everday
existence
of
the
Western
Saladin
Chamcha,
erstwhile
London
based
voice-over
artiste,
Satanic
goatman,
sequestered
in
scenario
comes,
of
from
voice
is
Mimi's:
I
critiques
of
the
West,
e.g.
that
here
a
to
Excuse
brown.
Shandaar
Cafe
today
all
the
talk
is
about
Chamcha
the
Anglo-
OF
famed
for
his
voice-over
the
great
projector
the
prestidigitator
has
a
Goat
crawled
back
secular
'colonial'
existential
..
wax,
of
migrant
experience
is
a
transitional
phenom­
enon
translational
one;
there
is
to
it
because
the
are
ambivalently
enjoined
life.
Living
lati
'
the
process
the
the
dramatizes
the
culture's
untranslatability;
doing,
the
question
riightmare,
Witn'fhe"iunbivalent
the
identification
difference.
ENTERS
THE
unequivocally
while
of
course,
fully
equivocal
diasporic
identity,
o ,
·
is
the
realist
is
of naming
institutions
,standpoint
conflict
of
cultures
been
terms
geopolitical
Western
literary
modernists,
the
quarrel
of
the
ancient
(ascriptive)
obscures
the
Dolder
of
hybridity
that
articulates
its
cultural
displacement,
is
to
sully
the
ineffability
of
the
sacred
name.
is by no means confined to the Islamic chapters', Sara Suleri writes in her fine reading of The Satanic Verses. '[A] postcol­onial desire for deracination, emblematized by the protagonist Saladin Chamcha, is equally represented as cultural heresy. Acts of historical or. cultural severance become those blasphemous moments that proliferate in the narrative ... '23 Blasphemy goes
ongins
Rushdie
the
migrant
sections
of
cross-cultural
is
not.
secular;
moment
when
content
a
culturaf
being
overwhelmed,
act
of
the
asserted
authenticity
of
tradition,
'secular'
blasphemy
releases
a
OF
CULTURE
that
reveals
the
contingencies,
even
the
incommensurabilit­
ies,
involved
process
of
social
transformation.
My
reading
of
blas­
phemy
in
the
context
of
the
real
event
of
the
fatwah.
Muslim
revisionary
narrative
form
of
the
novel
-
Uriknowri
traditional
Islamic
Rushdie
violates
real
crime,
eyes
of
the
clerics,
was
that
he
touched
Islamic
history
in
a
critical,
imaginative
ent
fashion
deep
historical
insight.'
It
could
be
argued,
I
think,
that
far
from
simply
tory
positions
within
reading,
Rushdie
subversion
the
act
of
cultural
translation
-
'intentionality'
locale
of
migrations
The
the
Mohamed
into
the
melodramatic
the­
atricality
of
a
popular
Bombay
movie,
in
a
hybrid­
-
the
'theological'
-
slippage
the
city
turning
difference
into
demonism;
The
social
racism,
driven
by
rumour,
becomes
politically
credible
negotiable:
'priests
became
involved,
adding
another
unstable
element
-
the
linkage
a
smooth
transition,
configuration
disjunctive
rewriting
ex
erience.
�Ifllyliiaity
heresy,
then
to
blaspheme
is
to
dream.
not
of
the
past
continuous
present;
it
is
not
the
nostalgic
dream
of
tradition,
of
it
is
the
dream
of
translation
as
'survival'
as
Derrida
translates
the
'time'
of
Benjamin's
concept
of
the
after-life
of
translation,
as
act
ENTERS
living
Rushdie
translates
dream
of
survival:
an
empowering
of
hybridity;
that
turns
depends,
.as
Rushdie
on.
focus
is
the
linkages
unstable
elements
of
literature
-
the
dangerous
tryst
with
the
'untranslatable'
-
rather
than
arriving
names.
The
'newness'
of
migrant
or
minority
discourse
has
to
be
discovered
newness
that
is
of
the
'progressivist'
division
or
on
the
the
suggestion
that
though
each
other,
striving
to
exclude
each
be
emergmg
contestation
social
'untranslatable'
-
element
in
the
the
And
it
is
this
seed
that
turns
into
the
famous,
overworked
analogy
Benjamin
essay:
unlike
the
original
where
fruit
and
skin
form
a
certain
unity,
in
the
act
of
trans­
lation
the
content
or
subject
overwhelmed
of
signification,
like
a
royal
robe
with
ample
folds.
I
interested
in
the
the
disjunction
in
which
successive
cultural
temporalities
are
LOCATION
CULTURE
work
of
history
and
nourishing
the
historically
understood
contains
time
as
a
pre­
cious
through
this
dialectic
of
cultural
negation-as-negotiation,
this
splitting
of
skin
instead to
conu:nuniqtti9n,.
posit:i.onality)
sign
of
translation
continually
tells,
the
different
times
iil"ii\onoii.to"aecanordse
itglvir\"i'iflhe-movem:ertr,·of
Jragrrierifa:tion,
'
'
'
'
'
....
the
of
a
performative,
projective
Brit-
ish
culture
of
race
and
racism
-
'illegal
immigrant,
outlaw
king,
foul
criminal
hero'.
somewhere
no
doubt,
after
Sufyan's
translation
of
Ovid's
waxy
Farishta,
later
book,
transforms
London
into
a
tropical
country
with
'increased
moral
definition,
institution
of
a
national
siesta,
vivid
patterns
of
behaviour',
the
deejay,
prancing
Pinkwalla,
the
revenge
of
black
history
expressivist
cultural
practices
of
toasting,
rapping
scene
that
blends
Madame
Tussaud's
with
the
black
history
emerge
to
dance
amidst
the
migrants
of
the
present
in
a
postcolonial
counter-masque
of
a
public
image
of
the
Rushdie
affair
has
become
mired
in
the
righteous
indignation
of
Magus
that
is
because
its
re-citation
within
a
feminist,
anti-
THE
WORLD
public
discourse
has
received
little
attention.
The
most
productive
debates,
initiatives,
in
the
post-fatwah
period,
have
come
from
women's
groups
like
Women
Against
Fundamentalism
and
Southall
Black
Sisters
Britain.
They
have
been
concerned
less
with
the
politics
of
textuality
terrorism,
with
demonstrating
that
the
secular,
global
issue
lies
uncannily
in
Britain
-
in
the
policies
of
local
government
race-relations
industry;
in
the
'racialization
of
religion'
Britain;
in
the
imposition
of
homogeneity
on
'minority'
populations
in
the
name
of
cultural
diversity
or
pluralism.
Feminists
have
not
after
Mohamed's
wives:
rather
have
to
the
politic­
ized
violence
brothel
bedroom,
raising
demands
for
the
establishment
of
refuges
for
minority
women
coerced
into
marriages.
Their
response
to
the
Rushdie
affair
reveals
what
describe
as
'the
feminist
policies
adopted
local
state
(mainly
councils)'.
such
lent,
antagonistic
identifications
of
class,
gender,
generation
dition,
the
British
feminist
movement
of
the
redefined
its
agenda.
The
Irish
question,
post-fatwah,
has
also
as
a
of
the
'racialization
of
religion'.
The
critique
of
patriarchal
fundamentalism
regulation
of
gender
desire
has
become
a
major
issue
for
minority
cultures.
Minority
artists
have
questioned
the
the
tropic
movement
of
cultural
translation,
as
Rush­
die
spectacularly
renames
London,
Indo-Pakistani
iteration,
as
'Ellowen
Deeowen'.
MATTERS
'libidinal
investments
of
a
more
narrative
kind'
a
rep­
resentative
discourse
of
minorities?
In
other
words
-
-
how
would
collective
agency
be
signified
in
a
question
of
essence
question
of
subject
position.'
position
articulates
'alternative
practices
that
are
embedded
often-damaged,
-fragmentary,
-hampered,
or
-occluded
work
of
been
'coerced
into
a
negative,
generic
subject
position,
the
oppressed
individual
transforms
it
into
a
positive
collective
fragmented,
partially
occluded
values
of
minority
discourse
are
both
continuous
with
Marxism,
according
to
Cornel
West.
He
proposes
a
genealogical
materialism
as
a
way
of
OF
a
'psycho-sexual
raciallogic'.
a
logic
of
living
that
cuts
across
life
of
different
ideological
forms
-
race,
religion,
patriarchy,
homophobia;
the
mechan­
isms
self-images
are
formed
realm
of
styles,
the
synchronous
contemporaneity
of
modernity.
It
is
too
easy
to
see
the
discourses
of
the
minority
as
the
postmodern
condition.
Jameson's
claim,
that
absence
genuine
class
consciousness,
'the
very
lively
social
struggles
of
the
are
largely
dispersed
(p.
not
sufficiently
register
the
antagonistic
displacement
that
minority
dis­
courses
initiate,
across,
with,
the
dialectics
of
class
identities.
a
'healthy'
sociological
holism
realism
(p.
323),
as
Jameson
derives
from
Georg
hardly
to
those
passionate
are
the
temporal
con­
ditions
of
postcolonial
critique.
state-civil
the
Indian
subaltern
scholar,
-
to
claim
that
the
idea
of
community
articulates
a
cultural
temporality
of
contingency
poten­
tially
subversive
it
refuses
to
go
a
category,
community
enables
a
division
identities.
Community
capital,
sub­
a
'split-and-double'
form
ENTERS
THE
WORLD
group
identification
which
Chatterjee
a
specifically
the
public
sphere.
The
colonized
civil
capital contradiction,
the
of
modernity:
in
the
ace
of
the
minori
,
civility;
in
the
transnational
world
i
rder-
of
the
divisions
of
social
space
neglect
the
profound
temporal
disjunction
-
the
translational
time
-
through
which
minority
communities
negotiate
their
collective
identifications.
For
discourse
of
minorities
is
the
creation
of
agency
through
incommensurable
(not
simply
multiple)
positions.
Is
there
a
a
space
through
the
power
of
naming.
language
develops
authority,
persona;
specifically
postcol­
onial
performance
of
reinscription,
the
focus
shifts
from
the
nominalism
of
imperialism
to
the
emergence
of
another
sign
of
agency
the
destiny
of
culture
as
a
site,
not
simply
of
subversion
and
transgression,
that
prefigures
a
kind
of
solidarity
OF
CULTURE
terrible
vowel,
that
this
stick
to
trace
our
names
sand
which
the
sea
erased
again,
to
our
indifference.
when
they
named
these
bays
bays,
was
it
nostalgia
or
irony?
Where
were
the
courts
of
Castille?
Versailles'
colonnades
supplanted
palms
with
Corinthian
crests,
belittling
diminutives,
then,
little
Versailles,
meant
plans
for
a
pigsty,
names
for
the
sour
apples
grapes
of
their
exile.
[
Being
men
they
could
not
live
except
they
first
presumed
the
right
of
everything
to
be
a
noun.
The
African
acquiesced,
repeated
them.
Listen,
my
children,
say:
hogplum,
wild
cherry,
bay,
with
the
fresh
green
voices
they
were
once
themselves
in
the
way
the
wind
bends
our
natural
inflections.
These
palms
are
greater
than
Versailles,
for
no
man
made
them,
their
fallen
columns
greater
than
Castille,
no
them
except
the
worm
who
has
no
THE
are
two
myths
history
in
each
of
them
related
to
opposing
versions
of
the
place
of
identity
in
the
process
of
cultural
knowledge.
There
is
the
pedagogical
process
of
imperialist
naming:
Being
men,
they
could
except
they
first
presumed
the
right
of
everything
to
be
a
noun.
Opposed
to
the
African
acquiescence
which,
in
repeating
the
lesson
of
the
masters,
changes
their
inflections:
hogplum
wild
cherry
the
fresh
they
were
once
themselves
purpose
is
not
to
oppose
the
pedagogy
of
the
imperialist
noun
to
the
inflectional
appropriation
of
the
native
voice.
He
proposes
to
such
binaries
of
power
in
order
to
reorganize
our
sense
of
the
process
of
identification
negotiations
of
cultural
politics.
He
stages
the
slaves'
simply
the
imperial­
ist
the
of
ev
be
a
noun'
the
masculi­
nist,
authoritative
subjectivity
produce
m
the
is
an
effect
of,
as
subjected
to,
the
sign
-
the
noun
-
of
a
colonizing
discourse?
end,
Walcott
poses
the
problem
of
'beginning'
outside
the
question
of
'origins',
beyond
that
perspectival
field
of
vision
-
constitutes
human
consciousness
in
the
mirror
of
nature,
as
has
famously
described
it.
history
begins
elsewhere.
He
leads
us
to
that
moment
of
undecidability
or
unconditionality
that
constitutes
the
ambivalence
of
modernity
as
it
executes
its
critical
judgements,
or
seeks
justification
for
its
social
facts.
the
possessive,
coercive
'right'
of
the
West­
Walcott
places
a
different
mode
of
postcolonial
speech;
a
historical
time
envisaged
in
the
discourse
of
the
enslaved
or
the
inden­
tured.
The
undecidability
from
which
Walcott
builds
his
narrative
opens
poem
to
the
historical
'present'
which
Walter
Benjamin
describes
as
a
'present
which
is
transition,
which
time
stands
still
and
has
come
to
a
stop'.
this
discursive
space
of
struggle,
the
violence
of
the
OF
CULTURE
began
like
the
that
terrible
vowel,
g o
o e
o e
made.
The
pronomial,
as
the
the
enslaved
colonial
the
the
symbolic
agency
of
history,
name
African.
With
this
disjunctive,
double
writes
a
histo
of
tural
that
envisages
the
production
of
difference
as
the
litical
e
tion
o
nt.
Cultural
differences
as
they
constitute
identities
-
contingently,
are
nominative
or
normative,
in
a
preliminary,
passing
moment;
when
they
are
culturally
productive
progressive.
Like
the
vowel
itself,
forms
of
social
identity
of
turning
an-other's
difference
ing
the
right
to
signify
into
of
cultural
translation.
otaheite
apple,
pomme
cythere,
pomme
granate,
moubain,
z'ananas
the
pineapple's
Aztec
ENTERS
WORLD
Come
back
to
me,
Come
back,
cacao,
grigri,
solitaire,
than
the
spirit
of
such
solidarity,
Walcott's
call
to
language
serves
a
symbolic
function.
As
the
poem
shuttles
(below).
History's
the
future,
once
again,
as
question.
of
initiation
that
enables
one
to
possess
again
in
the
movement
of
Walcott's
signs
of
survival,
the
terrain
of
other
histories,
the
hybridity
of
cultures.
The
act
of
cultural
translation
'the
transformation'
to
yield
a
sense
of
culture's
belonging:
generations
going,
generations
gone,
moi
c'est
gens
Ste.
Lucie
sorti:
is
there
that
I
bom.
from
the
little
pieces
of
the
poem,
its
going
there
rises
the
great
history
of
the
languages
and
landscapes
of
migration
time
revision
of
modernity
nigger!'
Look,
a
Negro!'
Frantz
Fanon,
these
words
are
said
in
anger
neverthe­
less
in
the
severe
staging
of
the
statistics
of
educational
performance
immigration
irregularities;
whenever
'Dirty
nigger!'
or,
'Look,
a
Negro!'
is
can
see
it
in
a
gaze,
or
hear
the
solecism
of
a
still
silence;
whenever
I
I
hear
a
racist,
or
catch
his
look,
I
of
Fanon's
evocatory
essay
'The
fact
of
blackness'
means
member
of
the
marginalized,
presence
is
-
in
the
double
sense
of
social
surveillance
same
time,
to
the
racist
gaze
the
very
understanding
of
humanity
in
the
world
of
modernity:
a
to
the
white
man.'
Elsewhere
he
has
written:
'The
Black
not.
[caesura]
Any
more
than
the
white
man'
(my
interpolation).
Fanon's
discourse
of
the
'human'
emerges
from
that
temporal
break
or
caesura
effected
in
the
continuist,
progressivist
myth
of
speaks
from
the
signifying
time-lag
of
cultural
difference
that
1
have
been
attempting
to
develop
as
a
structure
for
the
representation
of
subaltern
agency.
Fanon
writes
from
that
temporal
caesura,
the
time-lag
of
cultural
difference,
in
a
space
LOCATION
CULTURE
to
occupy
the
the
white
future.
But
Fanon
also
refuses
the
Hegelian-Marxist
dialectical
schema
whereby
the
black
transcendental
sublation:
a
dialectic
emerge
into
a
more
equitable
univer­
sality.
Fanon,
suggests
It
space
the
interruptive,
interroga­
tive,
tragic
experience
It
apprehension
social
question
-
erasure
-
negative
side
an
almost
substantive
absoluteness
has
to
essences
post­
identities.
As
make
clear,
for
me
the
project
rendered
insertion
'time-lag'
col­
onial
moments
emerge
as
sign
am
sceptical
transitions
Western
academic
writings
which
theorize
the
experience
appropriation
'Third
World'
discourse
the
more
do
reduce
a
genealog­
ies
institutional
practices,
into
a
for
the
critical
con­
venience
theory.
My
interest
influential
discussion
Foucault,
Lyotard
critical
discourse
an
epistemological
structure,"
To
succinctly,
the
objectification
knowledge,
. . .
used." (My
reflection
glass
-
the
-
revealed
the
parergon'.
living
description
theory,
'a
relation
to
the,
history
we
find
con­
vocabularies'
ironists
like
Richard
Rorty,
or
the
Macintyre
the
OF
CULTURE
or
the
projective
speech
community
that
is
rescued
in
his
concept
of
communicative
reason
that
is
expressed
pragmatic
logic
or
argument
'decentred'
understanding
of
the
world:
what
we
encounter
accounts
are
proposals
for
considered
to
be
the
essential
gesture
of
Western
modernity,
'present' in
right
with
others
of
what
one
might
become,
not
of
assuming
some
fully-fashioned
identity
which
is
merely
is
to
establish
a
modernity,
that
is
not
that
'now'
of
transparent
immediacy,
and
to
found
a
form
of
social
individu­
ation
where
communality
is
I
want
to
pose
of
a
contra-modernity:
what
is
modernity
colonial
conditions
where
its
imposition
is
itself
the
denial
of
historical
freedom,
civic
autonomy
and
the
these
engender.
For
example,
Houston
Baker's
reading
of
the
modernity
of
the
Harlem
Renaissance
strategically
elaborates
a
'deformation
of
mastery',
a
ver­
nacularism,
based
on
the
enunciation
of
the
subject
as
'never
a
simple
coming
into
release
from
.
revision
of
Western
suggests,
requires
both
linguistic
investi­
ture
of
the
subject
and
a
practice
of
diasporic
performance
that
is
gacks
or
transnational
cul­
each
time
locally
transnational
globality,
so
that
it
does
enthralled
by
the
glopal
techno!ogies
and
cultural
proposes
a
form
of
populist
modernism
to
comprehend
both
the
of
the
translation
that
does
not
of
a
cultural
tradition,
or
transpose
values
.
OF
of slavery
resolve
differences
a
locus
hybrid,
'inappropriate'
enunciative
that
I
have
opened
9)
for
the
signification
agency.
Differences.
constituted
through
the
social
conditions
temporal
caesura(
space
opens
. . .
. . .
a
.struggle
for
the
proper
name
within
a
scene
of
genealogical
indebted­
such
a
reinscription
sign
itself-
without
a
trans-
formation
site
danger
that
the
follow
the
teleological
thread
progress
possible;
one
within
the
modernity],
have
the
value
sign.?"
reading
suggests
sign
form
whose
value
OF
CULTURE
[of
progress]
which
has
from
the
beginning;
the
present
efficacity
dis­
position;
although
the
Revolution
questionable
results,
one
cannot
'distance'
the
meaning
Revolution
the
or
the
rue
des
Blancs­
Monteaux,
the
temporal
difference
colonial
space?
'moral
disposition
L'Ouverture
for
whom,
so
vividly
recalls,
the
signs
'liberty,
equality,
fraternity
French
Revolution
signified,
correspondence,
private
conversations.'20
make
figure
-
[ames
invokes
to
emerge.
For
the
discourse
the
time-lag,
or
temporal
caesura,
tension
everyday,
the
or
cultural
relativism
-
different
cultural
temporalities
same
'universal'
space
1984).
caesura
narrative
reveals
the
emergence
ernity
-
as
an
'ideology
new-
template
'non-place'
becomes
the
colonial
space.
this
in
a
double
way.
The
colonial
space
the
wasted
land
whose
history
has
to
be
begun,
whose
archives
filled
out;
whose
future
progress
But
the
colonial
space
also
stands
for
the
Orient
a
great
problem
for
the
definition
and
its
inscrip­
tion
history
colonized
from
the
perspective
West.
Despotic
time,
as
Althusser
has
brilliantly
described
it,
time
double-figure
which
moment
enlightenment
relation
to
the
Other,
you
can
see
the
historical
formation
said
disjunctive
present
my
caesura
occurs
within
the
invention
'long
imperial­
ist
'subalterns
seize
the
spectacular
event
do
catachrestic
gesture.
modernity's
'caesura'
and
using
it
to
transform
the
locus
and
writing
postcolonial
critique.
Listen
ironic
naming,
the
interrogative
oppression
is,
he
writes,
'both
continuous
with
the
Marxist
tradition'
an
.equally
contingent
relation
to
the
postcolonial
perspective
we
can
only
assume
a
disjunctive
and
displaced
relation
to
these
works;
we
cannot
accept
them
until
we
subject
them
to
a
temporal
sense
agency
with
which
you
are
now
(over)familiar,
obscurer
sense
early
days
OF
'flamboyant
ration­
ality'
Darwinism
to
Nazi
ideology,
entirely
ignoring
colonial
imperialist
ideas
within
the
genealogy
'colonial
grimly
amusing
[colonial]
bourgeois
gentilhomme
speaking
colonial
site
as,
contradictorily,
modernity
national
espousal
simultaneity
across
homogeneous
modal
narrative
imagined
com­
I
think,
the
Indian
suggest,
from
a
different
perspective,
'seals
theme
sociological
emergence
the
rep­
resentations
'outside'
modernity,
space
to
an
archaic
daydream,
Anderson
further
universalizes
his
homogeneous
imaginary.
the
disavowing
narrative
ofhistorical
deprives
minorities
marginal,
liminal
spaces
from
which
they
can
intervene
unifying
national
culture.
However,
each
time
such
a
homogeneity
identification
CULTURE
there
marked
disturbance
Foucault
awareness
postmodernity
least
as
important
sense'
aptly
describes
as
'ontologizing
the
limit
Worlds,
requires
a
form
oftime-lagged
signification,
for
as
he
writes:
this
century
has
situation
oppression
the
true
antonyms
are
always
the
exclusive
the
inclusive
whole
the
the
present
versus
the
rationality
which
turns
them
into
eo-victims,"
open
those
'welds'
a
postcolonial
contra­
modernity
becomes
visible.
What
Foucault
disavow
as
shall
call
'projective'
past,
a
form
future
anterior.
Without
the
postcolonial
time-lag
the
discourse
cannot,
I
believe,
be
written;
with
the
can
be
inscribed
as
a
historical
narrative
forms
antagonism
not
for
socialism
all
begin
the
reconstruction
hear
ambiguity
considerable
shift
time
OF
the
,temporal
action
-
its
progressive,
future
drive
-
'everything
act
slowing
down,
or
lagging,
'past',
its
the
circulatory
life
'sign'
present,
quickening
quotidian.
Where
these
temporalities
touch
contingently,
their
spatial
boundaries
it
negotiates
the
levels
time
have
tried
to
unearth
postcolonial
archaeology
you
time
or
history.
only
for
Toni
Morrison,
Afro-American
art
figure
ancestor:
this
person
this
ancestor.'43
ancestor
rises
from
the
guise
Beloved,
then
we
see
the
furious
emergence
projective
past.
Beloved
ancestor
describes
instructive
Her
presence,
which
foundly
time-lagged,
moves
forward
while
continually
encircling
'not-there'
which
Morrison
sees
stressed,
dislo­
catory
absence
for
the
rememoration
narrative
Ella,
a
standing
at
distance
from
the
'event'
from
which
modernity
produces
its
'sign',
the
projective
past:
The
future
was
forms
there
passivity;
there
violent
interrogation
to
have
not
simply
opposed
the
idea
with
the
battle
has
been
waged
discontinuity
figure
witness
postcolonial
modernity
we
have
another
wisdom:
it
comes
from
those
seen
the
nightmare
banal
daylight
everyday.
They
254
more
complex
than
either
the
nihilism
or
the
Utopia
They
speak
reality
that
constitutes
the
moment
salvation,
spoken
heroisms
or
the
horrors
Ella
says
is
to
be
a
world
solution
problem.'
defeatism.
limits
'idea'
the
marginal
displacement
the
meaning
limits
are
veiled,
unanswered
sphinxes
shores
Why
should
Aeschylus
have
thousand
years
before
Shakespeare
was
born?
Why
has
civilization
flourished
flamed
as
the
world
stands
meekly
such
questions,
shall
this
nation
proclaim
prejudices
freedom
to
those'
who
brought
the
Sorrow
Songs
to
the
Seats
Mighty?"
Du
Bois
makes
a
fine
answer
threnody
Sorrow
Songs,
their
eloquent
omissions
that
'conceal
much
CULTURE
doing,
through
the
veil,
emerges
a
figure
time
where
perfectibility
ineluctably
tied
to
the
myth
The
rhythm
Sorrow
Songs
may
at
times
be
swift
-
like
the
projective
at
other
times
it
may
be
slow
-
like
the
time-lag.
What
to
such
a
vision
future
belief
that
we
merely
change
the
histories,
our
sense
means
to
live,
to
be,
in
other
times
spaces,
both
historical.
discussion
boundaries
Bloomsbury,
1990),
especially
'Borderlines',
2
Renee
Green
interviewed
Interview
conducted
Kwon
for
the
exhibition
'Emerging
Artists',
Caracas,
Venezuela
(xeroxed
manuscript
copy).
4
ibid.,
Renee
Green
with
Donna
Harkavy,
Curator
the
Worcester
Museum.
6
ibid.
'\
7
'Theses
philosophy
Jonathan
Cape,
1970),
8
'Building,
dwelling,
thinking',
York:
1971),
9
1991.
'Chicane
movement/chicano
art'
(eds)
(Washington
Smithsonian
Institution
pp.
133-4.
(London:
218, 229, 231.
Chatto
1987),
pp.
198-9.
70-1.
Bloomsbury,
1990),
'The
uncanny',
Standard
Edition
Chicago
University
'The
cave
the
Faber,
1959),
(New
York:
Harcourt,
Brace,
1921),pp.9S-9.
LOCATION
CULTURE
29
ibid.,
30
32
ibid.
34
ibid.,
p.243.
36
ibid.,
p.249.
37
'Reality
shadow',
Martin
us
Nijhoff,
1987),
pp.
1-13.
38
ibid.
39
ibid.,
pp.
40
Bernasconi
quoted
Hill,
NC:
University
46
Morrison,
NLB,
1973),
T.HE
'Eurocentrics
Edinburgh',
1987),
for
style
See
particularly
footnote
I
(p.
148)
for
an
exposition
use
('the
judicious
distortion
truths
to
fit
western
prejudices').
2
See
'Teaching
Third
World
cinema'
and
'The
politics
lar
art
'Blue
election,
election
blues',
1987),pp.
Tavistock,
1972),pp.
Dent
1972),
pp.
For
a
significant
elaboration
similar
argument
see
eh,
For
a
philosophical
underpinning
concepts
I
Mass.:
Harvard
Univer­
sity
especially
eh,
Otherness
principles'
irreducible
impurity,
difference
that.
divides
them
against
themselves.
For
this
reason
owe
this
Martin
Thorn.
the
Hutchinson,
1987),
p.214.
[1961]),
Calder
pp.
16-17.
eh,
1973),
pp.
(London:
emphasis).
2
ibid.,
3
4
Fanon,
157-8.
5
'Theses
philosophy
Books,
1968),
6
Fanon,
ibid.,
'Concerning
violence',
9
ibid.
0
'The
imaginary',
MacCabe
Macmillan,
'Concerning
violence',
House,
1976),
pp.
14-29.
'Strangers
Hostile
Landscape',
(eds)
The
Women's
pp.
126-7.
Routledge
pp.
26-7.
'The
imagination
sign'/
Fontana,
1969)/
pp.
212-13.
'Imagination
sign'/
'Mirroring'/
the
Blackwell,
1980)/pp.
162-3.
'Imagination
sign',
'Seminar
1975'/
(eds)
Routledge
Barthes,
'Imagination
sign',
pp.
'Alienation'/
The
Derrida,
'The
double
session',
(trans.)
(Chicago:
University
212.
'The
double
session',
pp.
212-13.
28
(trans.)
(Baltimore,
Hop­
kins
University
Lacan,
'Alienation',
(trans.)
(London:
Tavistock,
1972)/
The
baud,
(trans.)
(Minneapolis:
University
pp.
39.
'Alienation'/
1
anthropological
understanding',
Books,
1983)/
Bass
(trans.)
(Chicago:
University
Sassoon,
Writers
and
Readers,
1982)/p.
'Imagination
sign',
p.
246.
pp.
231-2.
44
Fanon,
ibid.,
47
Sheridan
(trans.)
(New
1981)/p.
6
(London:
Institute
Art/
1988).
'Structure/
sign
discourse
Bass
(trans.)
(Chicago:
Chicago
University
Press,
1978)/
2
'Socialist,
feminist
struggles',
(1980)/
'Film
16/
24/
instance,
the
sign,
Barthes
finds
Japan
immediately
insightful
the
empire
universally:
Japan
can
only
Anti-West:
in
the
ideal
Japanese
house,
devoid
or
nearly
there
property;
provides
a
the
itself
as
subject
(or
master)
The
very
concept
(burning
frustration
for
Western
armchair
bed,
the
domestic
position).
Burch
(trans.)
1979)/pp.
13-14.
For
a
reading
relevant
argument,
see
feminism
international
frame',
(1981)/
pp.
154-84.
6
This
concept
developed
E.
Routledge
Paul,
1978)/p.
added.
8
ibid.,
ibid.,
pp.
58-9.
'The
confession
flesh',
Harvester
Press,
VII,
Pelican
Freud
Library
(Harmondsworth:
1981)/p.
345ff;
Macmillan,
1982)/pp.
67-78.
See
also
'The
same
stereotypes
32-3
pp.
33-7.
Pluto
Press,
1991);
'The
Fact
pp.
see
pp.
117/127.
pp.
62-3.
the
concept
Imaginary
see
'The
imaginary',
MacCabe
(ed.)
Macmillan,
1981).
'Racism
lier
(trans.)
(London:
Pelican,
Freud,
Penguin
Books,
1969).
2
pp.
15-16.
26
ibid.
27
Fanon,
28
fantasy)',
in
1980),
in
his
32
Fanon,
light',
in
his
(London:
The
2
1960),
3
1978),
or:
a
88,
no.
6
(1973),
5
the
282
(1812-13).
eh,
4,
p.
Bary
(ed.)
8
the
pp.
54-5.
9
Verso,
1983),p.
88.
pp.,88-9.
Men
(Ithaca:
Cornell
1915),
Skin,
vol.
.
the
critic',
his
(trans.)
(London:
I8I7,
5
mechanisms
paranoia
sexuality'
(1922),
(ed.)
(London:
The
Institute
'The
violence
(Baltimore:
[ohns
p.
I34.
3
4 I
'On
Liberty',
(ed.)
(London:
ibid.,
ibid.,
p.
Verso,
I983),
pp.
Mill,
(London:
Oxford
University
'Warren
Hastings',
Books,
I968),
p.263.
I5
Mill,
'On
Liberty',
I6
I839),
pp.
I8-25.
I7
For
a
further
elaboration
concept,
'Montesquieu:
politics
Brewster
(trans.)
(London:
Verso,
I982),
eh,
'Living
on:
Man,
Miller,
Rout­
ledge
Missionary
(ed.)
Cambridge
University
pp.
I66-7.
24
on
an
autobiographical
account
case
Library,
vol.
IX,
pp.
200-3;
see
also
the
Macmillan,
I980),
pp.
I54-7.
'The
structure
26
'Foundations
I883),
pp.
557-8.
27
John
Hunter,
I839),
pp.
323-4.
2
to
be
71, 72.
his
5
a
it
(London:
The
6 J
),
to
will
be
text.
T.
excellent
chapter,
his
14
flesh',
The
17
18
pp.
152--6.
Verso,
23
The
his
para.
59;
Baron
(New
1949),
p.57;
'Obser­
vations
(1812-13),
p.85.
(trans.)
(Harmondsworth:
pp.
181-2.
Grove
(London:
Tavistock,
1972),
Smirnoff,
'The
University
1980),
p.307.
30
Fanon,
'The
in
his
(New
(New
1978),
p.
99.
7
E.
A.
Lyall;
Carlyle,
'The
burial',
Stokes,
Oxford
University
1960),
P:28.
suggestive remarks
98-101.
5
(ed.)
W. W.
1963),
p.
28.
6
7
Forster,
Stokes,
9
Conrad,
I
pp.
212-13.
'The
violence
(trans.)
(Baltimore
ofNature
OF
CULTURE
'Further
operations
a
synthesis
for
debate',
52,
pp.
221-52.
Chicago
University
Effects
European
Thought'
(Cambridge:
The
Rede
Lecture,
1875).
foundations
government
Tavistock,
1972),
ibid.,
p.41.
29
Library,
1977,
government,'
(ed.),
32
ibid.,
34
ibid.,
36
'Des
tours
(ed.)
(Ithaca:
Cornell
University
'The
and
Library,
vol.
335-76.
38
(trans.
and
ed.),
1776),pp.li-lii.
Kamac,
1988),
8
Strimpel
(1914-87):
Pforzheim-Paris-Zurich­
Ahmedabad-Bombay-Milan-Lugano.
2
Quoted
3 I
Mass.:
Harvard
5
'Third
World
literature
era
capitalism',
1986),
and
'A
new
type
the
dissident',
(ed.)
Blackwell,
1986),
7
audiences,
constituencies
and
community',
(ed.)
'Narrating
the
nation;,
the
p.
Basil
Blackwell,
1983),
Verso,
1972),
(eds),
(trans.)
(Austin,
Texas:
University
p.31.
P:36andpassim.
'The
Strachey
(ed.)
(London:
The
Hogarth
236, 247.
Hutchinson,
1983).
the
Chicago
esp.
chs
8-9.
212-14;
26
Verso,
Verso,
Lloyd
University
Berkeley,
for
reminding
important
concept.
28
'Representing
the
colonized',
(winter
1989),
29
'Civilization
and
The
Hogarth
and
J.-L.
The
baud,
(Manchester:
Manchester
University
(trans.)
(London:
Routledge,
1987).
Mark
Cousins
pointed
remarkable
text.
See
his
review
(spring
1989).
What
follows
argument
to
book,
pp.
21-44.
and
(trans.)
(Manchester:
Manchester
University
'Women's
time',
267
OF
CULTURE
1986),
pp.
187-213.
This
to
the
insistent
questioning.
Gabriel's
nation',
Spivak
(trans.)
(Baltimore,
Md:
[ohns
Hop­
kins
University
.pp.
144-5.
Mass.:
Derrida,
44
Kristeva,
have
also
referred
here
to
an
be
found
on
quotations
are
from
the
shooting
script
the
Black
Collective.
the
Verso,
1983),
ibid.,
48
ibid.
49
ibid.
nation?',
(ed.)
Routledge,
ibid.,
'The
storyteller',
(London:
Cape,
55
56
'The
task
translator',
(London:
Cape,
57
ibid.
For
a
issue
see
Tejaswini
Niranjana,
Califor­
nia
University
58
N.
'Introjection
-
Incorporation',
(eds)
York:
International
1980),
I
have
composed
this
passage
from
quotations
text.
analysis
ego',
The
62
York:
Viking,
1988),
This
quotation.
ibid.,
p.
ibid.,
67
ibid.,
I
altered
the
presentation
passage
to
fit
sequence
argument.
68
Timothy
Bahti
have
translated
this
much-discussed
passage
for
me.
emphasize
form
articulation
difference
Man
clarifies
reading
Benjam­
in's
complex
image
[Benjamin)
fragments
constitute
a
totality,
he
fragments,
remain
essentially
fragmentary.
They
follow
each
other
Manchester
University
9
'My
(eds)
[ohns
Hopkins
University
(trans.)
(Cambridge,
Mass.:
MIT
3
Foreword
to
(Minneapolis:
University
pp.
vii-xii.
4
'Third
World
intellectuals
and
6
'Interview
with
Cornel
West',
(ed.)
Edinburgh
University
pp.
Verso,
1988),p.
273.
8
ibid.,
Cambridge
Univer­
sity
emphasis).
'Changing
the
'Negotiations
the
Hutchinson,
1987),
Jr,
the
I990s(New
Meridian,
York:
NAL,
wrote
this
section
Greenblatt's
musing
question,
22
ibid.,
'My
chances',
24
ibid.,
pp.
(trans.)
(Chicago:
University
(eds),
Press,
225, 227, 228.
66-7.,
Mine
celebratory,
situationist
repeatedly
chapter.'
Nebr.:
University
pp.
104-11.
(London:
Tavistock,
1977),
Barthes,
62,
emphasis).
historiography',
6
pp.
2
M. M.
(trans.)
(Austin,
Texas:
University
pp.
90-5.
42
ibid.,
Chicago
University
also
pp.
175-95.
Where
(ed.),
Press,
53
Press,
93.
57
Press,
59
give
'Spontaneity:
its
(London:
Tavistock,
66
68
69
emphasis).
2
(ed.),
(trans.)
Press,
4
7 I
Oxford
University
Press,
Kaye
the
Raj
Press,
'Fear
causes',
1974),pp.
247-57.
papers:
Home
Mise,
725,
Clarendon
Press,
1986),p.
and
Malleson,
papers:
Home
Misc.
725,p.
415.
Tavistock,
1983),p.
Misc.
'The
oriental
despot',
quoted
and
(eds)
(Cambridge:
Cambridge
Univer­
sity
Press,
1983),p.
I,
vol.
'The
new
2I
(winter
I992-3),
p.74.
I2
I
have
described
the
narrative
a
temporality
as
a
'projective
past'
reading
Morrison's
Chapter
I2.
I3
'Dead
on
Tune',
Cambridge
University
I990),p.
206.
'Decking
out:
performing
identities',
Fuss
York':
Routledge,
I99I),p.
I7.
'
I5
For
an
argument
be
taken
to
counter
this
claim
see
'Modernism
by
Seamus
Deane,
A
Field
Day
Company
Book
(Minneapolis:
Minne­
sota
University
I990),
[ameson
insists
Viking,
I988),p.
261.
I8
ibid.,
(New
York:Shocken
Books,
I968),
p.75.
2I
Rushdie,
Duckworth,
I988),
p.378.
Suleri,
.
24
18,
(I99I
discussion
in
this
paragraph
paraphrase
argument
and
research.
26
ibid.,
27
See
R
'The
satur­
nine
question
Reflections
on
Walter
Benjamin's
theory
I,
Fall
I986.
28
Benjamin,
29
'The
saturnine
vision',
3I
disjunctive
form
interaction
as
'refractive,
non-equivalent,
translation',
reading
emergence
national
canon.
See
University
pp.
Man,
Minnesota
University
34
ibid.,
pp.
29I-3.
35
ibid.,
36
See
'Fundamentalism
multiculturalist
fallacy',
the
Southall
Black
Sisters,
OF
CULTURE
University
'Race
theory',
verso,
'A
response
to
Taylor's
"Modes
ibid.,
'Names',
(London:
Faber,
Rorty,
the
Polity,
a
lengthy
elaboration
point.
'Theses
on
the
philosophy
withintro.
by
Hannah
Arendt,
trans.
Jonathan
Cape,
'Sainte
Lucie',
Cambridge
All
citations
from
Fanon
following
pages
come
from
'The
fact
(London:
Pluto,
Bois,
York:
Polity Press,
chs
Allen
Lane,
also
his
'The
art
oftelling
truth',
(ed.)
York:
Routledge,
Press,
(trans.)
(Chicago:
Chicago
manuscript.
9
the
Routledge,
16-17.
Young
argues
a
convincing
case
agains
theEurocentrism
exposition
historical
doc­
trines,
particular
in
the
Marxist
tradition,
while
demonstrating
at
the
same
time
spatializing
anti-historicism
remains
equally
Euro­
centric.
Young,
116-17.
II
T.
andtheHarlem
Chicago
lished
manuscript.
For
the
general
elaboration
thesis
see
various
issues
groove',
in
(ed.)
University
1990),
I
introduce
the
term
'time-lag'
more
specifically
in
Chapters
8
structure
'splitting'
discourse
have
been
elaborating
without
giving
it
a
my
very
earliest
essays.
'Des
Tours
de
Babel',
in
(ed.)
(Ithaca:
Cornell
University
Allison
'Modernity:
an
Certeau,
'The
historiographical
operation',
in
his
(trans.)
(New
York:
Columbia
University
Verso,
1972),
4.,
groove',
'Race
theory:
towards
a
genealogical
materialist
analysis',
M.
Marable,
(eds)
Verso,
Macmillan,
232-3.
:Post-Drientalist
Third-World
histories',
2
(April
Young,
in
suggests,
in
keeping
with
my
argu­
colonial
moment
liminal
point,
or
the
limit-text,
holistic
(trans.)
(New
York:
Semiotext(e),
Verso,
1983),
p.136.
ibid.
the
pp.
21-2.
(eds)
[ohns
Verso,
See
also
Verso,
1988),
pp.
Jr,
Sonia
Sanchez
Black
Renais­
sance',
(ed.)
ian,1990).
(trans.)
(London:
Books,
1973),
pp.
11-13.
I
phrases
the
problem
epic
theatre.
I
have
misrepresented
his
argument.
Morrison,
'The
ancester
(ed.)
pp.
256-7.
Bois,
Abrahams,
Karl
82,
writers
188-9;
Das
hybridity
193;
postcolonial
237;
205-6,
237;
40-1,
63;
colonial
condition
43-4;
Sartre
Althusser,
Louis
46,
critique
31;
time
246
ambivalence:
culture
129-38;
colonial
discourse
85-92;
colonial
86
America
6-7;
220,
240;
cultural
hybridity
185;
Harlem
Renaissance
144,
241;
Los
Angeles
240;
87,
154;
157-60;
imagined/communities
38,
141;
248-9;
189-90
19-20
Baker
Jr.,
241,
253
Bakhtin,
Mikhail
147;
188-9;
Roland
55,
69,
184,
185;
on
language
Bearce,
Walter
253;
163-4,
276-7;
state
on
time
95;
224,
227,
233
Bentham,
Jeremy
134
Berger,
Bible,
the:
108,
118;
hybridity
118-19;
116-17,
Bion,
Wilfred
206
Black
Renaissance
253
blacks
82;
African
Americans
246-7,
253-4;
Black
Renaissance
253;
155-7,
246;
British
writers
178;
culture
176;
music
178;
national
text
144-5;
Bonaventure
Hotel
220,
240
book:
116-17;
English
[ames
128,
218-19;
Rushdie
boundaries
34,
114;
national
nations
Bourdieu,
Carol
blacks
155-7,
elections
22;
Labour
27-8;
Southall
Black
uprising
156-7;
Irish
106,
Julianne
69
Butler,
Judith
219
Campbell,
Beatrix
27
215-16,
215;
connective
narratives
Angeles
217-18;
symbolic
chapati
story
201-7;
enunciative
level
194,230,
249
chicano
activity
cinema:
racism
221-2,
229-30;
negotiation
28-9
121;
hybridity
114-16
colonial
condition
43-4;
44-5;
historicized
culture:
ambivalence
129-38;
difference;
cultural
85-92;
closure
72;
difference
81;
doubling
96-7;
74-5;
74-5;
signifiers
89-90;
98-9,
131-2;
stereotype
72;
fantasy
82-4
colonial
government:
93;
colonial
identification
46
colonial
literature
93,
250-1;
136-7
colonial
marginality
book
77;
surveillance
76;
visibility
space
94,
108-9,
246;
115;
dividing
practices
hybridity
struggle
35-6
colonial
subject
42-5,
134-6;
75;
114,
116;
116-17;
consciousness
61-2;
discourse
66-84,
123-38;
desire
44-5,
62;
75,
81;
book
116;
hierarchization
83;
imitation
83;
79;
97;
123-38;
82-3;
concept
imagined
157-60
comprador
classes
Joseph
107,
on 174 contingency 186-90 contradiction 68 contra-modernity 6, 173, 175,
31, 32,
118, 126, 156,
203;
Foucault
on
243-4;
233-4;
political
lag
237
cultural
discourse
123-8
cultural
distance
219
cultural
diversity
enunciation
36,
176-8,
251-2
cultural
identification
152-7,
219
cultural
modernity
otherness
sign
215,
222
cultural
space
251-2
cultural
splitting
135-8
culturaltranslation
226-7,
228-9
cultural
undecidability
37-8,
153-4
culture
135-7;
beyond
I;
borderlines
34,
space
36,
176-9;
Freud
on
248
Darwish,
Mahmoud
Veena
192-3,
Dean,
Mitchel1194
deferral,
syntax
209;
55, 59,
98, 99,
127, 139, 171,
'Double
Session'
predication'
183-4;
'occidental
stereotomy'
239;
44-5,
31-2;
51-2;
and
racism
58;
structure
cultural
32,
33-5,
38,
118, 126, 156,
203;
discrimination
on
218;
36;
racial
on
23;
space
weather
169-70
discourse:
colonial
66-84,
85-92,
96-7,
construction
cultural
66-84,
123-8;
English
civil
227,
229-30,
246;
244-5,
251-2;
racist
and
difference
139, 148,
49-50,
52-7,
colonial
desire
88;
discourse
96-7;
discursive
on
51;
and
Foucault
I
234;
Alexander
255
Duff,
Alexander
33,
India
Company
Edinburgh's
Third
Cinema
Conference
English:
book
discourse
35, 36,
Bahktin
188;
and
chapati
story
culture
36,
176-8;
178-9,
185,
sign
247;
site
Third
Space
36-9;
as
time
lag
translation
228
Eurocentrlsm
eye
52-3,
55-6,
59;
and
Lacan
56
Fanon,
Frantz
88;
and
agency.
193-4;
and
Algeria
236-8;
and
collective
catharsis
colonial
space
131-2;
and
colonial
subject
75;
and
colonialism
cultural
undecidability
37-8,
153-4;
and
doubling
51;
61-2;
on
identity
51;
32;
35;
on
national
culture
152;
78,
238;
and
'occult
instability'
152-3;
and
racism
stereotypes
72-3,
Freud
on
and
patriarchy
1
Rushdie
affair
228-9;
sexuality
and
self
in
26;
women's
time
and
75;
and
otherness
66
123, 124,
243-4;
and
politics
postcolonial
symptom
195-6;
and
power
76,
116-17;
and
racism
247-8;
and
repeatable
materiality
22;
on
the
Stranger
166;
on
the
uncanny
.
[r.,
Henry
Louis
178-9,
community:
sexuality
and
self
Clifford
59
Gellner,
Ernest
127-8,
142,
negotiation
28-9;
and
sign
30,
178, 185,
143,
6-7,
218-19
Gordimer,
Nadine
borderlines
13-15;
and
hybridity
13-14;
and
interstices
unhomeliness
13-15
Gramsci,
Antonio
29
Grant,
Sir
Charles
86-8,
98,
Renee
3,
Ranajit
186-7,
205-6
Jiirgen
171,239,245
Halhed,
Nathanael
99,
Stuart:
alternative
modernity
252-3;
arbitrary
closure
179;
election
22;
and
cultural
sign
176-7;
and
Labour
and
negotiation
28-9;
new
Renaissance
144,241
Harris,
Wilson
38,
Warren
95,
Bessie
5
Heath,
Stephen
68-9
Hegel,
Friedrich
29,
Martin:
on
boundary
hierarchization:
colonialism
58;
historicism
41-2,
147,
195;Nandy
on
Thomas
94
Hobsbawm,
Eric
139
Hoffman,
E
Holbein,
Hans
David
38,
58,
·
agency
193;
'
American
cultural
185;
and
the
Bible
118-19;
music
178;
and
chicano
space
colonial
tex
128;
and
cultural
enunciations
251-2;
and
cultural
value
173;
and
and
imagined
communities
and
Indianized
Gospel
118;
\
and
Lacan
77,
communities
221;
Anderson
on
6
imaging
29
imitation:
colonial
double
think
Bengal
133;
Bible
105-6,108,115,116-17,118,
and
Christianity
rule
87;
Delhi,
siege
discursive
uncertainty
131;
Durgapuja
135;
East
India
Company
95,
education
94-5;
and
English
125-7;
government
law
116;
Meerut
rebellion
205;
activity
92,
98-99,
102-4,
129,
133-6,
and
Brahman
98;
Mutiny
198-211;
native
resistance
117-19;
postcolonial
251;
Vellore
Mutiny
Mutiny
198-211;
and
circulation
185,
2,
4,
217, 227,
art
colonial
text
174;
and
community
18,
127;
factual
and
projective
24-5;
global
217;
and
Gordimer
Green
3-4;
historical
intermediacy
219;
and
Morrison
culture
38
internationalism
5-6
intersubjectivity
192-3
intertextuality
47,
59
Irish
question
229
[ames,
174;on
revolution
244
[ames,
Henry
9
lames,
William
247
Jameson,
Fredric
219,
ambivalence
217,
223;'and
boundaries
class
221-2,
Conrad
174;
and
demographic
pluralism-221;
influences
216;
on
postmodern
214-15;Third
space
217-18
Janmohamed,Abdul
229
Jin,
Meling
45-6,
52-3,
Adil
45-8,
54, 58,
203-4,
207
Rudyard
87,
134,
226
Koreans
2
Kristeva,
[ulia
150,
gendered
sign
153;
and
women's
time
[acques
52,
and
desire
31-2;
and
the
evil
eye
56;
Fanon
on
32;
the
gap
53-4;
on
Holbein
57;
on
hybridity
Barthes
36;
foreignness.
spaces
149, 161,
liberty:
English
perplexity
David
229
Locke,
Los
254
Lukacs,
Georg
Sir
Alfred
56-7,
Alisdair
Maine,
Sir
colonial
83;
216;
Mason,
technology
Sir
105-7,117,
desire
44-5;
discourse
79,
81;
93, 96,
discourse
86;
colonialism
86;
vision
88;
120-1;
87;
87;
86;
postcolonial
drive
89;
surveillance
89;
visibility
27-8
minorities
152-7;
activity
33-4,
98-9,
92;
civilizing
alternative
252;
Benjamin
32-3;
literature
123-7;
cultural
157-61;
discourse
251-2;
disjunctive
Foucault
historical
214,
239;
244-5;
national
function
politics
241-2,
253,
254-5;
254;
lag
246-56;
Toni
213, 251, 254,
87, 88,
literature
national
difference
144-5;
151, 153,
228
negotiation
28-9;
Hall
interrogating
29;
Lacan
political
24-5;
space
184-5
239;
Nott,
Sir
William
71-4
Orientalist:
66-84,
44-5,
51-2;
text
46-8;
silent
97,
66;
mimicry
91;
09-1
criticism
67-8;
sexual
William
Carole
space
perplexity
Michel
212-29;
a
237;'belatedness
237-8;
criticism
247;
discourse
212;
Foucault
195-6;
history
46-52;
Irish
literature
migration
mimicry
253,
254-5;
perspective
141-2;
152-7;
struggle
33;
subject
writing
self/other
212-35
signs
222;
discourse
postorientalist
histories
247
N.
Enoch
Gyan
247
present
on
4,
233;
and
enunciation
178-9,
185,
247-51,
253,
254-5;
Anderson
British
uprising
156-7;
desire
78,
82,
83;
Fanon
Annie
191,
Ernest
materiality
Richard
46,
182,239;
and
difference
192;
'mirror
233;
on
solidarity
235
Rose,
[
acqueline
44
rumour
202,
Salman
2,
223-9;
and
blasphemy
225-6;
and
borderline
224;
feminism
228-9;
fundamentalist
reaction
225;
hybridity
167,
225-6;
racism
228
Sahlins-Marshall
37,
Edward
46,
85-6,
105,
the
copula
71;and
Foucault
72;
and
orientalist
power
71-4;
and
postcolonial
regions
Yunus
226
Sanchez,
Sonia
253,
255
Sartre,
[ean-Paul
alienation
44;
drive
76,82;
and
mimicry
89
scopic
view
Alan
8
self/other
41,
54,
postmodemism
Sunil
187,201-2
separation
and
colonialism
82-3
Serbia
5
sexuality:
and
colonial
discourse
74-5;
and
difference
73;
feminism
175;
and
gay
community
175;
hybridity
251;
lesbian
219;
Negro
and
Western
41;
otherness
67
S
akuntala
78,
82,
culture
174,
153;
modernity
254;
and
symbol
48-9,
52;
and
temporal
and
colonial
discourse
.
difference
123-7
slavery
16-18,86,97,
145,199,244,
251;
and
and
feminism
to
signify
233
sly
civility
Victor
difference
4
Southall
Black
Sisters
229
Southey,
Robert
Louise
Hortense
178,
Gayatri
183-4
splitting
216-17,
colonial
discourse
98-9,
131-2;
cultural
135-8;
subject
148,
Sri
Lanka,
theatre
Starn,
Robert
Fitzjames
132-3
stereotype
66-7;
children's
fiction
76;
colonial
discourse
72;
colonial
subject
78;
defined
81-2;
Fanon
on
72-3,
75-84;
and
Eric
89,
124,
204,
207-8
145,
192-3;
agency
192-3,
narratives
as
agent
Rabindranath
0
Charles
177,
213
territory
99-101
theory
academy
32;
and
cultural
sign
215;
and
elite
language
19,
30;
Eurocentricity
31;
location
22;
and
new
languages
20;
and
politics
25-31;
and
postmodemism
239;
as
20-1;
space
36-9;
[ameson
on
217-18;
and
temporality
219
time:
Althusser
on
246;
Anderson
on
157-60;
Benjamin
on
95;
157-60;
Lacan
on
191;
Women's
lag
191-2,
198,
199;
difference
237;
250;
246-56
timelessness
254
224, 227,
68-9
Walcott,.Derek
231-5
Warburton,
Bishop
Weber,
Samuel
86,
214
Welles,
West
21;
Foucault
on
32;
and
memory
166;
modernity
240;
'occidental
stereotomy'
182;
self­
understanding
239;
sexuality
Cornell
176,
229,
246
whiteness
76,
96
Williams,
Bernard
Raymond
148,
252;
'knowable
community'
Sherley
Anne
178
women:
and
miner's
strike
27-8;
Women
Against
Fundamentalism
229
World
Literature
African
American
178;
aloud
183-4,
186;
and
colonialism
93,
250-1;
Derrida
154;
and
government
93;
49-50;
and
modernity
250;
and
the
nation
145-6;
and
politics
21-2;
postcolonial
241;
the
world
240
Zizek,

Приложенные файлы

  • pdf 11398404
    Размер файла: 6 MB Загрузок: 0

Добавить комментарий