issue28_norse_coat


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Article: Copyright 2005 M
elina Hall.
Design and Layout: Copyright 2006 Caitlin Macpherson.
Article from Issue 28
length of tunic, evidenced in
contemporary sources such as
manuscripts.
This was sufficient evidence to
pattern. Tunics at that time also
featured a fuller skirt, achieved by
gores for greater freedom of
movement, so I added gores to
the pattern as well. These
alterations made the pattern very
similar to a t-tunic, except that
it has two front pieces.
An SCA related website
Below, Pic 4:
Article from Issue 28
Article: Copyright 2005 M
elina Hall.
Design and Layout: Copyright 2006 Caitlin Macpherson.
lichens or from overdying with a combination of
lichen/madder/woad. Green came from
overdyeing with weld and woad. (Walton 1988, 17-
18). Evidence of brown from walnut shells also
exists, as well as dark brown from walnut shells
and iron. (Hagg 1984, 289).
Some evidence suggests that particular colours
were prevalent in certain areas; reds in the Danelaw,
purples in Ireland and blues and greens in
Scandinavia (Walton 1988, 18). It is not clear why
this might have been the case.
Most solid basic colours are appropriate, such
as yellow, green, red, black, purple and blue. Natural
colours like white/off white and brown tones are
also good choices. Darker colours will show dirt
less, and if the coat is thick and heavily decorated,
you may not want to put it in the washing machine
too often. Thora Sharptooth has a good article
about Viking Age Dyestuff on her website. (See
http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/
vikdyes.html)
Avoid:
pastels, fluoro colours, prints.
Article: Copyright 2005 M
elina Hall.
Design and Layout: Copyright 2006 Caitlin Macpherson.
Article from Issue 28
from it twice and this should be your gore width.
In general, I make my gores anywhere from 45
cm to 65 cm wide. There is no extant evidence of
gore width. Do what is comfortable, and
remember that gores should start from your waist
point, not your hip point
are wider in the hips than the waist.
Article from Issue 28
Article: Copyright 2005 M
elina Hall.
Design and Layout: Copyright 2006 Caitlin Macpherson.
the two front pieces to the back piece at the
shoulders, then attach the sleeves, insert the side
gores and finally sew the side seam from hem to
wrist. Iron flat all seams - further finishing is not
necessary as these seams will be contained inside
the coat, unlikely to fray.
Try on for size. Pattern problems will
show now. This will be where you learn if you
need underarm gores, and if your side gores are
not full enough. The coat should be roomy enough
to allow free movement while being worn over
other layers of clothing.
You should be
walk normally when the coat is closed. If you can
not, add wider gores.
Amend your pattern pieces
Step Seven:
Cut out and make up the coat in
pattern layout
Article: Copyright 2005 M
elina Hall.
Design and Layout: Copyright 2006 Caitlin Macpherson.
Article from Issue 28
2. Photo of Goldglubr gold plates,
.gif Accessed 21/04/05.
3. Photo of manuscript featuring King Cnut.
5. Valkyrie, from
e119.gif Accessed
(formerly Countess Serena of the
Black Ness) is a native scot, sold to her husband at a
young age,and now living in Jorvik, who has agreed to
assume the ways of the norse including a new name, in

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